Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 15, Issue 9, pp 911–920

A prospective study of diet and prostate cancer in Japanese men

  • Naomi E. Allen
  • Catherine Sauvaget
  • Andrew W. Roddam
  • Paul Appleby
  • Jun Nagano
  • Gen Suzuki
  • Timothy J. Key
  • Kojiro Koyama
Article

Abstract

Background and aims. It has been hypothesized that some aspect of a traditional ‘Asian’ diet, that is low in animal products and high in soya, may be associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. This study aimed to examine the association between dietary intake and prostate cancer risk among 18,115 men in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, using prospective data from the Life Span Study. Methods: Subjects completed a food-frequency questionnaire at baseline (1963, 1965 and/or 1979) and were followed for incident prostate cancer until the end of 1996. During this time, 196 incident prostate cancer cases were identified after 252,602 person-years of observation. Poisson regression was used to calculate incidence rates for each dietary factor after adjustment for age, calendar period, city of residence, radiation dose and education level. Results: Fish intake was significantly associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer; men who consumed fish more than four times per week had a 54 increased risk of developing prostate cancer compared with men who ate fish less than twice per week (RR=1.54; 95 CI, 1.03–2.31). No other food items, including soya products, were significantly associated with prostate cancer risk. Conclusions: These data suggest that dietary factors may not be strong determinants of prostate cancer in these Japanese men, although the increased risk associated with a high consumption of fish warrants further study.

Keywords

prostate cancer diet fish soya atomic-bomb survivors Japan 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Naomi E. Allen
    • 1
  • Catherine Sauvaget
    • 2
  • Andrew W. Roddam
    • 1
  • Paul Appleby
    • 1
  • Jun Nagano
    • 2
    • 3
  • Gen Suzuki
    • 4
  • Timothy J. Key
    • 1
  • Kojiro Koyama
    • 2
  1. 1.Cancer Research UK Epidemiology UnitUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK
  2. 2.Department of EpidemiologyRadiation Effects Research FoundationHiroshimaJapan
  3. 3.Institute of Health ScienceKyushu UniversityJapan
  4. 4.Department of Clinical StudiesRadiation Effects Research FoundationHiroshimaJapan

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