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Journal of Business Ethics

, Volume 160, Issue 3, pp 745–763 | Cite as

Leader Mindfulness and Employee Performance: A Sequential Mediation Model of LMX Quality, Interpersonal Justice, and Employee Stress

  • Jochen RebEmail author
  • Sankalp Chaturvedi
  • Jayanth Narayanan
  • Ravi S. Kudesia
Original Paper

Abstract

In the present research, we examine the relation between leader mindfulness and employee performance through the lenses of organizational justice and leader-member relations. We hypothesize that employees of more mindful leaders view their relations as being of higher leader-member exchange (LMX) quality. We further hypothesize two mediating mechanisms of this relation: increased interpersonal justice and reduced employee stress. In other words, we posit that employees of more mindful leaders feel treated with greater respect and experience less stress. Finally, we predict that LMX quality serves as a mediator linking leader mindfulness to employee performance—defined in terms of both in-role and extra-role performance. Across two field studies of triadic leader-employee-peer data (Study 1) and dyadic leader–employee data (Study 2), we find support for this sequential mediation model. We discuss implications for theorizing on leadership, organizational justice, business ethics, LMX, and mindfulness, as well as practical implications.

Keywords

Business ethics Extra-role performance In-role performance Interpersonal justice Leadership Leader mindfulness LMX Mindfulness Organizational justice Stress 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jochen Reb
    • 1
    Email author
  • Sankalp Chaturvedi
    • 2
  • Jayanth Narayanan
    • 3
  • Ravi S. Kudesia
    • 4
  1. 1.Lee Kong Chian School of BusinessSingapore Management UniversitySingaporeSingapore
  2. 2.Imperial College LondonLondonUK
  3. 3.National University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore
  4. 4.Temple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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