Journal of Business Ethics

, Volume 130, Issue 4, pp 819–831

CEO Ethical Leadership and Corporate Social Responsibility: A Moderated Mediation Model

  • Long-Zeng Wu
  • Ho Kwong Kwan
  • Frederick Hong-kit Yim
  • Randy K. Chiu
  • Xiaogang He
Article

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between CEO ethical leadership and corporate social responsibility by focusing on the mediating role of organizational ethical culture and the moderating role of managerial discretion (i.e., CEO founder status and firm size). Based on a sample of 242 domestic Chinese firms, we found that CEO ethical leadership positively influences corporate social responsibility via organizational ethical culture. In addition, moderated path analysis indicated that CEO founder status strengthens while firm size weakens the direct effect of CEO ethical leadership on organizational ethical culture and its indirect effect on corporate social responsibility. Theoretical and managerial implications of these results are discussed.

Keywords

CEO Ethical Leadership Corporate social responsibility Managerial discretion Organizational ethical culture 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Long-Zeng Wu
    • 1
  • Ho Kwong Kwan
    • 2
  • Frederick Hong-kit Yim
    • 3
  • Randy K. Chiu
    • 4
  • Xiaogang He
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Management, Department of ManagementXiamen UniversityXiamenPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.School of International Business AdministrationShanghai University of Finance and EconomicsShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Department of MarketingHong Kong Baptist UniversityKowloon TongHong Kong
  4. 4.Department of ManagementHong Kong Baptist UniversityKowloon TongHong Kong

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