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Journal of Business Ethics

, Volume 121, Issue 2, pp 315–328 | Cite as

Roche’s Clinical Trials with Organs from Prisoners: Does Profit Trump Morals?

  • Judith Schrempf-Stirling
Article

Abstract

This case study discusses the economic, legal, and ethical considerations for conducting clinical trials in a controversial context. In 2010, pharmaceutical giant Roche received a shame award by the Swiss non-governmental organization Berne Declaration and Greenpeace for conducting clinical trials with organs taken from executed prisoners in China. The company respected local regulations and industry ethical standards. However, medical associations condemned organs from executed prisoners on moral grounds. Human rights organizations demanded that Roche ended its clinical trials in China immediately. Students are expected to review the economic and ethical issues regarding the outsourcing of clinical trials to controversial human rights contexts, and discuss how to make business decisions when there are conflicts between making profit and ethical considerations. Was Roche complicit in the human rights violations that were related to its clinical trials? Future patients might benefit from these clinical trials. Do profit and the greater good, in general, trump morals?

Keywords

Human rights Roche China Clinical trials Organ transplantation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author wishes to thank Guido Palazzo for his invaluable assistance in the case study, and members of the Berne Declaration and Amnesty International for their support during the work on the case study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Robins School of BusinessUniversity of RichmondRichmondUSA

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