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Change in study randomization allocation needs to be included in statistical analysis: comment on ‘Randomized controlled trial of weight loss versus usual care on telomere length in women with breast cancer: the lifestyle, exercise, and nutrition (LEAN) study’

  • Stephanie L. DickinsonEmail author
  • Lilian Golzarri-Arroyo
  • Andrew W. Brown
  • Bryan McComb
  • Chanaka N. Kahathuduwa
  • David B. Allison
Letter to the Editor

Notes

Funding

This work was funded in part by the National Institute of Health (NIH): R25HL124208, R25DK099080, P30AG050886 and U24AG056053. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily of the NIH or any other organization.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

In the last 12 months, Dr. Allison has received personal payments or promises for same from: American Society for Nutrition, American Statistical Association, Biofortis, Columbia University, Fish and Richardson, P.C., Frontiers Publishing, Henry Stewart Talks, IKEA, Indiana University, Laura and John Arnold Foundation, Johns Hopkins University, Law Offices of Ronald Marron, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Sage Publishing, The Obesity Society, Tomasik, Kotin and Kasserman LLC, University of Alabama at Birmingham, University of Miami, Nestle, WW (formerly Weight Watchers International, LLC). Donations to a foundation have been made on his behalf by the Northarvest Bean Growers Association. Dr. Allison is an Unpaid Member of the International Life Sciences Institute North America Board of Trustees. Dr. Allison’s institution, Indiana University, has received funds to support his research or educational activities from: NIH, Alliance for Potato Research and Education, American Federation for Aging Research, Dairy Management, Inc., Herbalife, Laura and John Arnold Foundation, Oxford University Press. In the last 12 months, Dr. Brown has received personal payments or paid travel from: American Society for Nutrition, Indiana University, Kentuckiana Health Collaborative, Rippe Lifestyle Institute, Inc. Dr. Brown’s institution, Indiana University, has received funds to support his research or educational activities from: American Federation for Aging Research, Dairy Management, Inc., NIH, Oxford University Press, University of Alabama at Birmingham. The other authors declare that they have no disclosures.

Ethical approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsIndiana University School of Public Health-BloomingtonBloomingtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Applied Health ScienceIndiana University School of Public Health-BloomingtonBloomingtonUSA
  3. 3.Division of Biostatistics, Department of Population HealthNew York University Langone HealthNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Department of Human Development and Family StudiesTexas Tech UniversityLubbockUSA

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