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Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 172, Issue 3, pp 545–550 | Cite as

The St. Gallen International Expert Consensus Conference on the Primary Therapy of Early Breast Cancer 2017: Egyptian view

  • Hussein Khaled
  • Heba Gamal
  • Mohamed Lotayef
  • Michael Knauer
  • Beat Thürliman
Review
  • 83 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

The theme of the 15th St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference 2017 in Vienna, Austria was about seeking where appropriate to escalate or de-escalate therapies for early breast cancer based on the up-to-date information of loco-regional and systemic therapies. Along with this line, a group of Egyptian experts decided to arrange for a consensus session to elicit the differences and similarities in therapy recommendations for early breast cancer in Egypt compared to the original Saint Gallen voting and recommendations.

Methods

During the Egyptian National Cancer Institute’s Annual Congress held in November 2017, 30 Egyptian scientists and clinicians from different specialties gathered in a special session and voted on the same questions of the original 15th St. Gallen consensus. Therapies were discussed from different aspects including their intensity, duration, and side effects, and were correlated with tumor stage and tumor biology.

Results and conclusions

This report summarizes the voting questions and resulting percentages of answers of the Egyptian scientists. Interestingly the differences were minimal between the Cairo and original Saint Gallen Consensus denoting a more global view of breast cancer management all over the world.

Keywords

Breast cancer Adjuvant therapy Egypt 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Egyptian Panel Members: Alaa Kandil (Clinical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt), Amany Helal (Medical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt), Azza Nasr (Radiation Oncology Departments, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt), Emad El-Gemeiey (Pathology Departments, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt), Hanaa Atteya (Clinical Oncology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Egypt), Heba El-Zawahry (Medical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt), Inas Abdel-Halim (Clinical Oncology Department, Mansoura University), Magda El-Mongy (Radiation Oncology Departments, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt), Medhat El-Sebaie (Radiation Oncology Departments, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt), Mohamed Shaalan (Surgical Oncology Departments, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt), Mostafa El Serafi (Medical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt), Nasr Allahloubi (Medical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt), Omar Zakaria (Surgical Oncology Departments, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt), Osman Mansour (Medical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt), Rabab Gaafar (Medical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt), Sherif Naguib (Surgical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt), Tarek Hashem (Clinical Oncology Department, Menofia University), Yousry Wassef (Medical Oncology Department, Maadi Military Hospital, Egypt), Abeer Bahnassy (Pathology Departments, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt), Ahmed El-Khodary (Medical Oncology Department, Maadi Military Hospital, Egypt), Nadia El Deeb (Clinical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt), and Hoda Abdel Baki (Radiation Oncology Departments, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Hussein Khaled declares that he has no conflict of interest; Heba Gamal declares that she has no conflict of interest; Mohamed Lotayef declares that he has no conflict of interest; Michael Knauel declares that he has no conflict of interest; Beat Thürliman has consultant/advisory role for Amgen, Astra Zeneca, Eli Lilly, Pfizer, and stock ownership in Novartis, and Roche Pharmaceutical companies.

Ethical approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hussein Khaled
    • 1
  • Heba Gamal
    • 2
  • Mohamed Lotayef
    • 3
  • Michael Knauer
    • 4
  • Beat Thürliman
    • 4
  1. 1.Medical Oncology, National Cancer InstituteCairo UniversityCairoEgypt
  2. 2.Surgical Oncology, National Cancer InstituteCairo UniversityCairoEgypt
  3. 3.Radiation Oncology Departments, National Cancer InstituteCairo UniversityCairoEgypt
  4. 4.Breast CenterKantonsspital St. GallenSt. GallenSwitzerland

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