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Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 147, Issue 1, pp 113–118 | Cite as

Mammography screening and the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: a prospective study

  • Vasily Giannakeas
  • Jan Lubinski
  • Jacek Gronwald
  • Pal Moller
  • Susan Armel
  • Henry T. Lynch
  • William D. Foulkes
  • Charmaine Kim-Sing
  • Christian Singer
  • Susan L. Neuhausen
  • Eitan Friedman
  • Nadine Tung
  • Leigha Senter
  • Ping Sun
  • Steven A. NarodEmail author
Epidemiology

Abstract

Women with a genetic predisposition to breast cancer may be at increased risk of cancer after exposure to ionizing radiation. It is unclear whether mammography screening increases the risk of breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. We identified 2,346 women with a BRCA1 (n = 1844) or BRCA2 (n = 502) mutation and no breast cancer, and we reviewed their history of mammography exposure. These women were followed for an average of 5.3 years and were observed for new breast cancer diagnoses. At study entry, 1808 women (77.1 %) reported ever having had a mammogram; of these, 204 women (11.2 %) reported having had a mammogram before age 30. We estimated the hazard ratios for the development of invasive breast cancer, conditional on the number of prior mammograms and on the age at first mammogram. Hazard ratios were estimated and stratified by gene (BRCA1 or BRCA2), relative to women with no exposure. We observed no significant association between prior mammography exposure and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 carriers (HR 0.79; 95 % CI 0.53–1.19; P = 0.26) or for BRCA2 carriers (HR 0.90; 95 % CI 0.35–2.34; P = 0.83). An early age at first mammogram (<30 years) did not increase breast cancer risk among BRCA1 carriers (HR 0.75; 95 % CI 0.41–1.37; P = 0.35) or among BRCA2 carriers (HR 0.69; 95 % CI 0.19–2.48; P = 0.57). Exposure to mammography in women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations is not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer.

Keywords

BRCA1 BRCA2 Mammography Breast cancer 

List of Abbreviations

BRCA1

Breast cancer susceptibility gene 1

CI

Confidence interval

HR

Hazard ratio

SD

Standard deviation

Notes

Acknowledgments

The work was supported by a grant from the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute. SAN is a holder of a Canada Research Chair. Vasily Giannakeas was supported by the Helen Marion Walker—Soroptimist Scholarship. We would like to thank Alejandra Ragone, Marcia Llacuachaqui, and Linda Steele for study enrollment and data collection. SLN is the Morris and Horowitz Families Endowed Professor.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that no conflict of interest exists.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vasily Giannakeas
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jan Lubinski
    • 3
  • Jacek Gronwald
    • 3
  • Pal Moller
    • 4
  • Susan Armel
    • 5
  • Henry T. Lynch
    • 6
  • William D. Foulkes
    • 7
  • Charmaine Kim-Sing
    • 8
  • Christian Singer
    • 9
  • Susan L. Neuhausen
    • 10
  • Eitan Friedman
    • 11
  • Nadine Tung
    • 12
  • Leigha Senter
    • 13
  • Ping Sun
    • 2
  • Steven A. Narod
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Dalla Lana School of Public HealthUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Familial Breast Cancer Research UnitWomen’s College Research InstituteTorontoCanada
  3. 3.International Hereditary Cancer Center, Department of Genetics and PathologyPomeranian Medical UniversitySzczecinPoland
  4. 4.Research Group Inherited Cancer, Department of Medical GeneticsOslo University HospitalOsloNorway
  5. 5.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  6. 6.Department of Preventative Medicine and Public HealthCreighton University School of MedicineOmahaUSA
  7. 7.McGill Program in Cancer Genetics, Departments of Oncology and Human GeneticsMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  8. 8.BC Cancer AgencyVancouverCanada
  9. 9.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Comprehensive Cancer CenterMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria
  10. 10.Department of Population SciencesBeckman Research Institute of City of HopeDuarteUSA
  11. 11.The Susanne Levy Gertner Oncogenetics Unit, Chaim Sheba Medical Center and the Sackler School of MedicineTel-Aviv UniversityTel-HashomerIsrael
  12. 12.Beth Israel Deaconess Medical CenterBostonUSA
  13. 13.Division of Human GeneticsThe Ohio State University Medical Center, Comprehensive Cancer CareColumbusUSA

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