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Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 134, Issue 1, pp 307–313 | Cite as

A prospective, multicenter, controlled, observational study to evaluate the efficacy of a patient support program in improving patients’ persistence to adjuvant aromatase inhibitor medication for postmenopausal, early stage breast cancer

  • Ke-Da Yu
  • Ying Zhou
  • Guang-Yu Liu
  • Bin Li
  • Ping-Qing He
  • Hong-Wei Zhang
  • Li-Hua Lou
  • Xiao-Jia Wang
  • Shui Wang
  • Jin-Hai Tang
  • Yin-Hua Liu
  • Xiang Wang
  • Ze-Fei Jiang
  • Li-Wen Ma
  • Lin Gu
  • Ming-Zhi Cao
  • Qing-Yuan Zhang
  • Shen-Ming Wang
  • Feng-Xi Su
  • Hong Zheng
  • Hong-Yuan Li
  • Li–Li Tang
  • Sheng-Rong Sun
  • Jin-Ping Liu
  • Zhi-Ming Shao
  • Zhen-Zhou ShenEmail author
Clinical Trial

Abstract

Since the rate of persistence to adjuvant endocrine therapy such as 5-year aromatase inhibitors (AI) would decrease over time in patients with hormone-sensitive breast cancer, it is necessary to investigate if a patient support program could modify patients’ beliefs and improve their persistence to AI treatment. This was a prospective, multicenter, controlled, observational study to evaluate the efficacy of a patient support program in improving postmenopausal patients’ persistence to adjuvant AI medication for early stage breast cancer (NCT00769080). The primary objective was to compare the rates of 1-year persistence to upfront adjuvant AI for patients in the two observational arms (standard treatment group and standard treatment plus patient support program group). In this study, 262 patients were enrolled in the standard treatment group and 241 patients in the standard treatment plus patient support program group. The mean 1-year persistence rates were 95.9 and 95.8 % for the standard treatment group and the standard treatment plus patient support program group, respectively (P = 0.95). The mean times to treatment discontinuation were 231.2 days in the standard treatment group and 227.8 days in the standard treatment plus patient support program group, with no statistically significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.96). There was also no statistically significant difference in the reason for treatment discontinuation (P = 0.32). There was a significant relationship between the patient centered care questionnaire and poor persistence (odds ratio = 3.9; 95 % CI, 1.1–13.7; P = 0.035), suggesting that the persistence rate of patients with whom the doctor always or usually spends time is greater than that of patients with whom the doctor sometimes or never spends time. Patients’ persistence to adjuvant AI medication for postmenopausal, early stage breast cancer is relatively high in the first year and is not significantly increased by adding a patient support program to standard treatment.

Keywords

Breast cancer Patient support program Compliance Aromatase inhibitor 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research is supported by grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (30971143, 30972936, 81001169, 81102003), the Shanghai United Developing Technology Project of Municipal Hospitals (SHDC12010116), the Key Clinical Program of the Ministry of Health (2010–2012), the Zhuo-Xue Project of Fudan University, and the Shanghai Committee of Science and Technology Fund for 2011 Qimingxing Project (11QA1401400). The funders had no role in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Conflicts of interest

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ke-Da Yu
    • 1
  • Ying Zhou
    • 1
  • Guang-Yu Liu
    • 1
  • Bin Li
    • 1
  • Ping-Qing He
    • 2
  • Hong-Wei Zhang
    • 3
  • Li-Hua Lou
    • 4
  • Xiao-Jia Wang
    • 5
  • Shui Wang
    • 6
  • Jin-Hai Tang
    • 7
  • Yin-Hua Liu
    • 8
  • Xiang Wang
    • 9
  • Ze-Fei Jiang
    • 10
  • Li-Wen Ma
    • 11
  • Lin Gu
    • 12
  • Ming-Zhi Cao
    • 13
  • Qing-Yuan Zhang
    • 14
  • Shen-Ming Wang
    • 15
  • Feng-Xi Su
    • 16
  • Hong Zheng
    • 17
  • Hong-Yuan Li
    • 18
  • Li–Li Tang
    • 19
  • Sheng-Rong Sun
    • 20
  • Jin-Ping Liu
    • 21
  • Zhi-Ming Shao
    • 1
  • Zhen-Zhou Shen
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Breast Surgery, Cancer Center and Cancer Institute, Shanghai Medical CollegeFudan UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Shanghai 6th HospitalShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.Zhejiang Province Traditional Chinese MedicineHangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  5. 5.Zhejiang Cancer HospitalHangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  6. 6.People’s Hospital of JiangsuNanjingPeople’s Republic of China
  7. 7.Jiangsu Cancer HospitalNanjingPeople’s Republic of China
  8. 8.Peking University First HospitalBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  9. 9.Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical SciencesBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  10. 10.307 Hospital of People’s Liberation ArmyBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  11. 11.Peking University Third HospitalBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  12. 12.Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin Medical UniversityTianjinPeople’s Republic of China
  13. 13.The Affiliated Hospital, Qingdao University Medical CollegeQingdaoPeople’s Republic of China
  14. 14.The Third Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical UniversityHarbinPeople’s Republic of China
  15. 15.The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen UniversityGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  16. 16.The Second Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen UniversityGuangzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  17. 17.West China Hospital, Sichuan UniversityChengduPeople’s Republic of China
  18. 18.First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical UniversityChongqingPeople’s Republic of China
  19. 19.Xiangya Hospital, Central-south UniversityChangshaPeople’s Republic of China
  20. 20.People’s Hospital of HubeiWuhanPeople’s Republic of China
  21. 21.Sichuan Provincial People’s HospitalChengduPeople’s Republic of China

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