Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 130, Issue 3, pp 1057–1061 | Cite as

Prospective study of breast cancer risk for mutation negative women from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation positive families

  • S. L. Harvey
  • R. L. Milne
  • S. A. McLachlan
  • M. L. Friedlander
  • K. E. Birch
  • P. Weideman
  • kConFab Investigators
  • D. Goldgar
  • J. L. Hopper
  • K. A. Phillips
Brief Report

Abstract

Published studies have reached contradictory conclusions regarding breast cancer risk for women from families segregating a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who do not carry the family-specific mutation. Accurate estimation of breast cancer risk is crucial for appropriate counselling regarding risk management. The aim of this study is to prospectively assess whether breast cancer risk for mutation negative women from families segregating BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations is greater than for women in the general population. Eligible women were 722 first-, second- and third-degree relatives of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carrier from 224 mutation positive (128 BRCA1, 96 BRCA2) families, had no personal cancer history at baseline, and had been tested and found not to carry the family-specific mutation. Self-reported family history of cancer, preventive interventions and verified cancer diagnoses were collected at baseline, and every 3 years thereafter. Median follow-up was 6.1 years (range 0.1–12.4 years). Time at risk of breast cancer was censored at cancer diagnosis or risk-reducing surgery. Standardised incidence ratios (SIR) were estimated by comparing observed to population incidences of invasive breast cancer using Australian Cancer Incidence and Mortality Books. Six cases of invasive breast cancer were observed. The estimated SIRs were 1.14 (95% CI: 0.51–2.53) overall (n = 722), 1.29 (95% CI: 0.58–2.88) when restricted to first- and second-degree relatives of an affected mutation carrier (n = 442) and 0.48 (95% CI: 0.12–1.93) when restricted to those with no family history of breast cancer in the non-mutation carrying parental lineage (n = 424). There was no evidence that mutation negative women from families segregating BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations are at increased risk of breast cancer. Despite this being the largest prospective cohort to assess this issue, moderately increased breast cancer risk (2-fold) cannot be ruled out.

Keywords

BRCA1 BRCA2 Phenocopy Breast cancer Risk 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank Lucy Stanhope, Heather Thorne, Eveline Niedermayr, the kConFab research nurses and staff, the heads and staff of the Family Cancer Clinics and the many families for their contributions to this resource. The Clinical Follow Up Study was funded 2001–2009 by NHMRC and currently by the National Breast Cancer Foundation and Cancer Australia (#628333). kConFab is supported by grants from the National Breast Cancer Foundation, the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and by the Queensland Cancer Fund, the Cancer Councils of New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia, and the Cancer Foundation of Western Australia. KAP is the Cancer Council Victoria, Dr John Colebatch Clinical Research Fellow.

Conflict of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. L. Harvey
    • 1
  • R. L. Milne
    • 2
  • S. A. McLachlan
    • 3
    • 4
  • M. L. Friedlander
    • 5
  • K. E. Birch
    • 1
  • P. Weideman
    • 1
  • kConFab Investigators
    • 6
  • D. Goldgar
    • 7
  • J. L. Hopper
    • 2
  • K. A. Phillips
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Division of Cancer MedicinePeter MacCallum Cancer CentreMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.Centre for Molecular, Environmental, Genetic & Analytic Epidemiology, School of Population HealthThe University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  3. 3.Department of Medical OncologySt Vincent’s HospitalFitzroyAustralia
  4. 4.Department of MedicineThe University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  5. 5.Department of Medical OncologyPrince of Wales HospitalSydneyAustralia
  6. 6.Research DivisionPeter MacCallum Cancer CentreMelbourneAustralia
  7. 7.Department of MedicineUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA

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