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Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 124, Issue 3, pp 883–887 | Cite as

Glutathione S-transferase P1 Ile105Val polymorphism and breast cancer risk: convergence and divergence of the two recent meta-analyses

  • Konstantinos P. EconomopoulosEmail author
  • Theodoros N. Sergentanis
Letter to the Editor

To the Editor,

We read with great interest the recent meta-analysis by Lu et al. [1], which has reached important conclusions about the association between glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) Ile105Val polymorphism and breast cancer risk.

Nevertheless, some methodological issues need to be addressed concerning the meta-analysis by Lu et al. [1]. Importantly, three sizeable eligible studies [2, 3, 4] (2,204 cases and 2,530 controls) have not been included in the meta-analysis, even though they satisfied the search criteria.

In addition, close inspection of the data provided by the authors (Table 1) revealed some issues that are worth discussing, so as to provide the scientific audience with an accurate presentation of the underlying data. Specifically, the data reported by Lu et al. [1] for the studies by Maugard et al. [5], Krajinovic et al. [6], Unlu et al. [7] and Torresan et al. [8] do not seem in line with the data provided in the original publications. The genotype frequencies...

Keywords

Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Risk Genotype Frequency Recessive Model Original Publication 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Lu S, Wang Z, Cui D, Liu H, Hao X (2010) Glutathione S-transferase P1 Ile105Val polymorphism and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis involving 34,658 subjects. Breast Cancer Res Treat. doi: 10.1007/s10549-010-0969-x
  2. 2.
    Chang TW, Wang SM, Guo YL, Tsai PC, Huang CJ, Huang W (2006) Glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms associated with risk of breast cancer in southern Taiwan. Breast 15:754–761CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    McCarty KM, Santella RM, Steck SE, Cleveland RJ, Ahn J, Ambrosone CB, North K, Sagiv SK, Eng SM, Teitelbaum SL et al (2009) PAH-DNA adducts, cigarette smoking, GST polymorphisms, and breast cancer risk. Environ Health Perspect 117:552–558PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Steck SE, Gaudet MM, Britton JA, Teitelbaum SL, Terry MB, Neugut AI, Santella RM, Gammon MD (2007) Interactions among GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms, cruciferous vegetable intake and breast cancer risk. Carcinogenesis 28:1954–1959CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Maugard CM, Charrier J, Pitard A, Campion L, Akande O, Pleasants L, Ali-Osman F (2001) Genetic polymorphism at the glutathione S-transferase (GST) P1 locus is a breast cancer risk modifier. Int J Cancer 91:334–339CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Krajinovic M, Ghadirian P, Richer C, Sinnett H, Gandini S, Perret C, Lacroix A, Labuda D, Sinnett D (2001) Genetic susceptibility to breast cancer in French-Canadians: role of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes and gene-environment interactions. Int J Cancer 92:220–225CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Unlu A, Ates NA, Tamer L, Ates C (2008) Relation of glutathione S-transferase T1, M1 and P1 genotypes and breast cancer risk. Cell Biochem Funct 26:643–647CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Torresan C, Oliveira MM, Torrezan GT, de Oliveira SF, Abuazar CS, Losi-Guembarovski R, Lima RS, Urban CA, Cavalli IJ, Ribeiro EM (2008) Genetic polymorphisms in oestrogen metabolic pathway and breast cancer: a positive association with combined CYP/GST genotypes. Clin Exp Med 8:65–71CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Lee SA, Fowke JH, Lu W, Ye C, Zheng Y, Cai Q, Gu K, Gao YT, Shu XO, Zheng W (2008) Cruciferous vegetables, the GSTP1 Ile105Val genetic polymorphism, and breast cancer risk. Am J Clin Nutr 87:753–760PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Egan KM, Cai Q, Shu XO, Jin F, Zhu TL, Dai Q, Gao YT, Zheng W (2004) Genetic polymorphisms in GSTM1, GSTP1, and GSTT1 and the risk for breast cancer: results from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study and meta-analysis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 13:197–204CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Sergentanis TN, Economopoulos KP (2010) GSTT1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis. Breast Cancer Res Treat 121:195–202CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Sergentanis TN, Economopoulos KP (2010) Eligible and not eligible studies in the recent meta-analysis about p53 polymorphism and breast cancer risk. Breast Cancer Res Treat 120:261–262CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Economopoulos KP, Sergentanis TN (2010) Does race modify the association between CYP1B1 Val432Leu polymorphism and breast cancer risk? A critical appraisal of a recent meta-analysis. Breast Cancer Res Treat. doi:101007/s10549-010-1097-3

References for Rebuttal letter

  1. 1.
    Lu S, Wang Z, Cui D, Liu H, Hao X (2010) Glutathione S-transferase P1 Ile105Val polymorphism and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis involving 34,658 subjects. Breast Cancer Res Treat [Epub ahead of print]Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Chang TW, Wang SM, Guo YL, Tsai PC, Huang CJ, Huang W (2006) Glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms associated with risk of breast cancer in southern Taiwan. Breast 15:754–761CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    McCarty KM, Santella RM, Steck SE, Cleveland RJ, Ahn J, Ambrosone CB, North K, Sagiv SK, Eng SM, Teitelbaum SL et al (2009) PAH-DNA adducts, cigarette smoking, GST polymorphisms, and breast cancer risk. Environ Health Perspect 117:552–558PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Steck SE, Gaudet MM, Britton JA, Teitelbaum SL, Terry MB, Neugut AI, Santella RM, Gammon MD (2007) Interactions among GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms, cruciferous vegetable intake and breast cancer risk. Carcinogenesis 28:1954–1959CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Maugard CM, Charrier J, Pitard A, Campion L, Akande O, Pleasants L, Ali-Osman F (2001) Genetic polymorphism at the glutathione S-transferase (GST) P1 locus is a breast cancer risk modifier. Int J Cancer 91:334–339CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Krajinovic M, Ghadirian P, Richer C, Sinnett H, Gandini S, Perret C, Lacroix A, Labuda D, Sinnett D (2001) Genetic susceptibility to breast cancer in French-Canadians: role of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes and gene-environment interactions. Int J Cancer 92:220–225CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Unlu A, Ates NA, Tamer L, Ates C (2008) Relation of glutathione S-transferase T1, M1 and P1 genotypes and breast cancer risk. Cell Biochem Funct 26:643–647CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Torresan C, Oliveira MM, Torrezan GT, de Oliveira SF, Abuazar CS, Losi-Guembarovski R, Lima RS, Urban CA, Cavalli IJ, Ribeiro EM (2008) Genetic polymorphisms in oestrogen metabolic pathway and breast cancer: a positive association with combined CYP/GST genotypes. Clin Exp Med 8:65–71CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Lee SA, Fowke JH, Lu W, Ye C, Zheng Y, Cai Q, Gu K, Gao YT, Shu XO, Zheng W (2008) Cruciferous vegetables, the GSTP1 Ile105Val genetic polymorphism, and breast cancer risk. Am J Clin Nutr 87:753–760PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Egan KM, Cai Q, Shu XO, Jin F, Zhu TL, Dai Q, Gao YT, Zheng W (2004) Genetic polymorphisms in GSTM1, GSTP1, and GSTT1 and the risk for breast cancer: results from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study and meta-analysis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 13:197–204CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Konstantinos P. Economopoulos
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Theodoros N. Sergentanis
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.School of MedicineNational University of AthensAthensGreece
  2. 2.Society of Junior DoctorsAthensGreece

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