Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 122, Issue 3, pp 859–865

Medical comorbidities predict mortality in women with a history of early stage breast cancer

  • Ruth E. Patterson
  • Shirley W. Flatt
  • Nazmus Saquib
  • Cheryl L. Rock
  • Bette J. Caan
  • Barbara A. Parker
  • Gail A. Laughlin
  • Kirsten Erickson
  • Cynthia A. Thomson
  • Wayne A. Bardwell
  • Richard A. Hajek
  • John P. Pierce
Epidemiology

DOI: 10.1007/s10549-010-0732-3

Cite this article as:
Patterson, R.E., Flatt, S.W., Saquib, N. et al. Breast Cancer Res Treat (2010) 122: 859. doi:10.1007/s10549-010-0732-3

Abstract

This analysis was conducted to determine whether comorbid medical conditions predict additional breast cancer events and all-cause mortality in women with a history of early stage breast cancer. Women (n = 2,542) participating in a randomized diet trial completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding whether they were currently being treated for a wide variety of diseases (cardiovascular, diabetes, gallbladder, gastrointestinal, arthritis, and osteoporosis) and conditions (high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol level). Height and weight were measured at baseline. Participants were followed for a median of 7.3 years (range 0.8–15.0). Cox regression analysis was performed to assess whether comorbidities predicted disease-free and overall survival; hazard ratio (HR) was the measure of association. Overall, there were 406 additional breast cancer events and 242 deaths. Participants with diabetes had over twofold the risk of additional breast cancer events (HR 2.1, 95% CI: 1.3, 3.4) and mortality (HR 2.5, 95% CI: 1.4, 4.4). The presence of multiple comorbidities did not statistically significantly predict additional breast cancer events. However, compared to no comorbidities, participants with 3 or more comorbidities had a HR of 2.1, 95% CI: 1.3, 3.3 for mortality. In conclusion, type 2 diabetes is associated with poor breast cancer prognosis. Given that 85% of deaths were caused by breast cancer, these findings suggest that multiple comorbidities may reduce the likelihood of surviving additional breast cancer events.

Keywords

Comorbidities Breast cancer Mortality 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruth E. Patterson
    • 1
  • Shirley W. Flatt
    • 1
  • Nazmus Saquib
    • 1
  • Cheryl L. Rock
    • 1
  • Bette J. Caan
    • 2
  • Barbara A. Parker
    • 1
  • Gail A. Laughlin
    • 3
  • Kirsten Erickson
    • 1
  • Cynthia A. Thomson
    • 4
  • Wayne A. Bardwell
    • 1
  • Richard A. Hajek
    • 5
  • John P. Pierce
    • 1
  1. 1.Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Moores UCSD Cancer CenterUniversity of CaliforniaSan Diego, La JollaUSA
  2. 2.Division of ResearchKaiser Permanente Northern CaliforniaOaklandUSA
  3. 3.Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaSan Diego, La JollaUSA
  4. 4.Arizona Cancer CenterUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  5. 5.Department of Health Disparities ResearchThe University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA

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