Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 117, Issue 3, pp 683–686 | Cite as

A BRCA2 founder mutation and seven novel deleterious BRCA mutations in southern Chinese women with breast and ovarian cancer

  • Ava Kwong
  • L. P. Wong
  • H. N. Wong
  • F. B. F. Law
  • E. K. O. Ng
  • Y. H. Tang
  • W. K. Chan
  • L. S. Ho
  • K. H. Kwan
  • M. Poon
  • T. T. Wong
  • F. C. S. Leung
  • S. W. W. Chan
  • M. W. L. Ying
  • E. S. K. Ma
  • J. M. Ford
Letter to the Editor

Notes

Acknowledgments

We sincerely thank Dr. Ellen Li Charitable Foundation, The Kuok Foundation, Hong Kong Cancer Fund, National Institute of Health 1R03CA130065, and North California Cancer Center for their support. We also like to thank the research staff at Hong Kong Sanatorium and Hospital who have contributed to this project.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ava Kwong
    • 1
    • 11
    • 12
  • L. P. Wong
    • 2
    • 12
  • H. N. Wong
    • 1
  • F. B. F. Law
    • 2
  • E. K. O. Ng
    • 1
  • Y. H. Tang
    • 1
  • W. K. Chan
    • 3
  • L. S. Ho
    • 5
  • K. H. Kwan
    • 6
  • M. Poon
    • 7
  • T. T. Wong
    • 4
  • F. C. S. Leung
    • 8
  • S. W. W. Chan
    • 9
  • M. W. L. Ying
    • 10
  • E. S. K. Ma
    • 2
    • 12
  • J. M. Ford
    • 11
  1. 1.Division of Breast Surgery, Queen Mary and Tung Wah HospitalThe University of Hong KongPokfulamHong Kong
  2. 2.Department of Molecular PathologyHong Kong Sanatorium and HospitalHappy ValleyHong Kong
  3. 3.Department of PathologyHong Kong Sanatorium and HospitalHappy ValleyHong Kong
  4. 4.Department of SurgeryHong Kong Sanatorium and HospitalHappy ValleyHong Kong
  5. 5.Princess Margaret HospitalKowloonHong Kong
  6. 6.Tuen Mun HospitalTuen MunHong Kong
  7. 7.Queen Elizabeth HospitalKowloonHong Kong
  8. 8.Pamela Youde Nethersole HospitalChai WanHong Kong
  9. 9.United Christian HospitalKwun TongHong Kong
  10. 10.Kwong Wah HospitalKowloonHong Kong
  11. 11.Stanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  12. 12.The Hong Kong Hereditary and High Risk Breast Cancer ProgrammeThe Hong Kong Hereditary Breast Cancer Family RegistryHappy ValleyHong Kong

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