Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 113, Issue 1, pp 189–196 | Cite as

Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 and estrogen receptor expression, a demonstration project using the residual tissue respository of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program

  • W. F. Anderson
  • S. Luo
  • N. Chatterjee
  • P. S. Rosenberg
  • R. K. Matsuno
  • M. T. Goodman
  • B. Y. Hernandez
  • M. Reichman
  • M. P. Dolled-Filhart
  • R. M. O’Regan
  • M. Garcia-Closas
  • C. M.  Perou
  • I. Jatoi
  • R. W. Cartun
  • M. E. Sherman
Epidemiology

Abstract

Background In 2001, the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program established Residual Tissue Repositories (RTR) in the Hawaii, Iowa, and Los Angeles Tumor Registries to collect discarded tissue blocks from pathologic laboratories within their catchment areas. To validate the utility of the RTR for supplementing SEER’s central database, we assessed human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) and estrogen receptor expression (ER) in a demonstration project. Materials Using a prepared set of tissue microarrays (TMAs) residing in the Hawaii Tumor Registry (HTR), we performed standard immunohistochemistry. Breast cancers in the TMA were diagnosed in 1995, followed through 2006, and linked to SEER’s main database. Results The TMA included 354 cases, representing 51% of 687 breast cancers in the HTR (1995). The HTR and TMA cases were similar with respect to patient demographics and tumor characteristics. Seventy-six percent (76%, 268 of 354) of TMA cases were HER2+ and/or ER+, i.e., 28 HER2+ER−, 12 HER2+ER+, and 228 HER2−ER+. There were 67 HER2−ER− cases and 19 were unclassified. Age distributions at diagnosis were bimodal with dominant early-onset modes for HER2+ER− tumors and dominant late-onset modes for HER2−ER+ breast cancers. Epidemiologic patterns for concordant HER2+ER+ (double-positive) and HER2−ER− (double-negative) were intermediate to discordant HER2+ER− and HER2−ER+. Conclusion Results showed contrasting incidence patterns for HER2+ (HER2+ER−) and ER+ (HER2−ER+) breast cancers, diagnosed in 1995. Though sample sizes were small, this demonstration project validates the potential utility of the RTR for supplementing the SEER program.

Keywords

Immunohistochemical stains Tissue microarrays Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) Estrogen receptor (ER) Breast cancer incidence and survival SEER 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported in part by the Intramural Research Program of the NIH/National Cancer Institute, and the Public Health Service contract N01-PC-67001 from DHHS/NIH.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. F. Anderson
    • 1
  • S. Luo
    • 1
  • N. Chatterjee
    • 1
  • P. S. Rosenberg
    • 1
  • R. K. Matsuno
    • 1
  • M. T. Goodman
    • 2
  • B. Y. Hernandez
    • 2
  • M. Reichman
    • 3
  • M. P. Dolled-Filhart
    • 4
  • R. M. O’Regan
    • 5
  • M. Garcia-Closas
    • 1
  • C. M.  Perou
    • 6
  • I. Jatoi
    • 7
  • R. W. Cartun
    • 8
  • M. E. Sherman
    • 1
  1. 1.NIH/NCI/DCEGBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.University of HawaiiHonoluluUSA
  3. 3.NIH/NCI/DCCPSBethesdaUSA
  4. 4.HistoRxBranfordUSA
  5. 5.Emory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  6. 6.University of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA
  7. 7.National Naval Medical Center and the Uniformed Services University of the Health SciencesBethesdaUSA
  8. 8.Hartford HospitalHartfordUSA

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