Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 105, Issue 2, pp 157–167 | Cite as

Mesenchymal stem cells as a vehicle for targeted delivery of CRAds to lung metastases of breast carcinoma

  • Mariam A. Stoff-Khalili
  • Angel A. Rivera
  • J. Michael Mathis
  • N. Sanjib Banerjee
  • Amanda S. Moon
  • A. Hess
  • Rodney P. Rocconi
  • T. Michael Numnum
  • M. Everts
  • Louise T. Chow
  • Joanne T. Douglas
  • Gene P. Siegal
  • Zeng B. Zhu
  • Hans Georg Bender
  • Peter Dall
  • Alexander Stoff
  • Larissa Pereboeva
  • David T. Curiel
Preclinical Study

Abstract

Purpose

Alternative and complementary therapeutic strategies need to be developed for metastatic breast cancer. Virotherapy is a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer in which the replicating virus itself is the anticancer agent. However, the success of virotherapy has been limited due to inefficient virus delivery to the tumor site. The present study addresses the utility of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as intermediate carriers for conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) to target metastatic breast cancer in vivo.

Experimental design

HMSC were transduced with CRAds. We used a SCID mouse xenograft model to examine the effects of systemically injected CRAd loaded hMSC or CRAd alone on the growth of MDA-MB-231 derived pulmonary metastases (experimental metastases model) in vivo and on overall survival.

Results

Intravenous injection of CRAd loaded hMSCs into mice with established MDA-MB-231 pulmonary metastatic disease homed to the tumor site and led to extended mouse survival compared to mice treated with CRAd alone.

Conclusion

Injected hMSCs transduced with CRAds suppressed the growth of pulmonary metastases, presumably through viral amplification in the hMSCs. Thus, hMSCs may be an effective platform for the targeted delivery of CRAds to distant cancer sites such as metastatic breast cancer.

Keywords

Breast cancer Cell vehicle CRAds Metastases Stem cells Virotherapy 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by Grant of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Sto 647/1-1 (to M. A. Stoff-Khalili), by grants from the National Institutes of Health 5T32CA075930 (NIH Training Grant) and Department of Defense: W81Xwh-05-1-035 (to D. T. Curiel). R01CA93796, R01CA98543 and AR46031 (to G. P. Siegal) and from the Louisiana Gene Therapy Research Consortium, Inc. (to J. M. Mathis) and R01CA108585 (to J. T. Douglas).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mariam A. Stoff-Khalili
    • 1
    • 2
  • Angel A. Rivera
    • 1
  • J. Michael Mathis
    • 3
  • N. Sanjib Banerjee
    • 4
  • Amanda S. Moon
    • 6
  • A. Hess
    • 2
  • Rodney P. Rocconi
    • 1
  • T. Michael Numnum
    • 1
  • M. Everts
    • 1
  • Louise T. Chow
    • 4
  • Joanne T. Douglas
    • 1
  • Gene P. Siegal
    • 1
  • Zeng B. Zhu
    • 1
  • Hans Georg Bender
    • 2
  • Peter Dall
    • 2
  • Alexander Stoff
    • 1
    • 5
  • Larissa Pereboeva
    • 1
  • David T. Curiel
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Human Gene Therapy, Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Pathology and the Gene Therapy CenterUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA
  2. 2.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical CenterUniversity of DuesseldorfDuesseldorfGermany
  3. 3.Gene Therapy Program, Department of Cellular Biology and AnatomyLouisiana State University Health Sciences CenterShreveportUSA
  4. 4.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular GeneticsUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA
  5. 5.Department of Plastic and Reconstructive SurgeryDreifaltigkeits-HospitalWesselingGermany
  6. 6.Animal Resources ProgramUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA

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