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Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 90, Issue 3, pp 295–298 | Cite as

Validation of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast Symptom Index (FBSI)

  • Kathleen J. Yost
  • Susan E. Yount
  • David T. Eton
  • Cheryl Silberman
  • Anne Broughton-Heyes
  • David Cella
Article

Summary

We assessed the reliability, validity, and responsiveness to change of the 6-item Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast Symptom Index (FBSI) in a sample of 615 metastatic breast cancer patients. The FBSI is a brief, clinically relevant, and psychometrically sound instrument that can be used to measure symptoms in patients with breast cancer.

Keywords

breast cancer health-related quality of life meaningful differences reliability symptoms validity 

Abbreviations:

CR

complete response

ECOG

Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group

EWB

Emotional Well-Being

FACT

Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy

FBSI

FACT-Breast Symptom Index

FWB

Functional Well-Being

HRQL

health-related quality of life

MID

minimally important difference

PD

progressive disease

PR

partial response

PSR

Performance status rating

PWB

Physical Well-Being

s.d.

standard deviation

SD

stable disease

SWB

Social/family Well-Being

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathleen J. Yost
    • 1
  • Susan E. Yount
    • 1
  • David T. Eton
    • 1
  • Cheryl Silberman
    • 2
  • Anne Broughton-Heyes
    • 3
  • David Cella
    • 1
  1. 1.Center on Outcomes, Research and Education (CORE)Evanston Northwestern Healthcare Research InstituteEvanstonUSA
  2. 2.AstraZeneca LP DelawareWilmington
  3. 3.AstraZeneca, FE2/C3, ParklandsMacclesfieldUK

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