Biology & Philosophy

, Volume 28, Issue 1, pp 141–144

On the ‘transmission sense of information’

Article

Abstract

In order to illuminate the role of information in biology, Bergstrom and Rosvall (Biol Philos 26:159–176, 2011a; Biol Philos 26:195–200, 2011b) propose a ‘transmission sense of information’ which builds on Shannon’s theory. At the core of the transmission sense is an appeal to the reduction in uncertainty in receivers and to etiological function. I explore several ways of cashing out uncertainty reduction as well as the consequences of appealing to function.

Keywords

Information Shannon Genes Function Behaviour 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Divinity, History and PhilosophyUniversity of AberdeenAberdeenUK

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