Biology & Philosophy

, Volume 26, Issue 6, pp 905–913 | Cite as

A gene’s eye view of Darwinian populations

Review of Peter Godfrey-Smith's Darwininan populations and natural selection. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2009
Review Essay

Abstract

Biologists and philosophers differ on whether selection should be analyzed at the level of the gene or of the individual. In Peter Godfrey-Smith’s book, Darwinian Populations and Natural Selection, he argues that individuals can be good members of Darwinian populations, whereas genes rarely can. I take issue with parts of this view, and suggest that Godfrey-Smith’s scheme for thinking about Darwinian populations is also applicable to populations of genes.

Keywords

Population Natural selection Heredity Organism Replicator 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyRice UniversityHoustonUSA

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