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Biologia Plantarum

, Volume 53, Issue 2, pp 325–328 | Cite as

In vitro direct organogenesis and regeneration of Medicago sativa

  • J. J. Li
  • Y.M. Wu
  • T. Wang
  • J. X. Liu
Brief Communication

Abstract

A rapid and efficient plant regeneration protocol for a wide range of alfalfa genotypes was developed via direct organogenesis. Through a successive excision of the newly developed apical and axillary shoots, a lot of adventitious buds were directly induced from the cotyledonary nodes when hypocotyl of explants were vertically inserted into modified Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 0.025 mg dm−3 thidiazuron (TDZ) and 3 mg dm−3 AgNO3. When the lower part of shoots excised from explants were immersed into the liquid medium with 1.0 mg dm−3 α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) for 2 min, and then transferred to hormone free half-strength MS medium, over 83.3 % of the shoots developed roots, and all plantlets could acclimatize and establish in soil. The protocol has been successfully applied to eight genotypes, with regeneration frequencies ranging from 63.8 to 82.5 %.

Additional key words

alfalfa cotyledonary node mature embryo silver nitrate thidiazuron vitrification 

Abbreviations

MS

Murashige and Skoog

NAA

α-naphthaleneacetic acid

TDZ

thidiazuron

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Animal SciencesZhejiang UniversityHangzhouP.R. China

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