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Biologia Plantarum

, 52:396 | Cite as

Changes in activities of antioxidant enzymes during Chenopodium murale seed germination

  • J. Bogdanović
  • K. Radotić
  • A. Mitrović
Brief Communication

Abstract

The activities and isoenzyme pattern of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) have been studied during germination of Chenopodium murale seeds. CAT and SOD activities were similar in dry seeds and during first 2 d of imbibition. CAT activity increased during radicle protrusion and early seedling development. The maximum SOD activity was found at final stages of germination and early seedling development. POD activity was not detected until the 6th day of germination, indicating POD involvement not until early seedling development. Gibberellic acid (GA3, 160 µM) delayed and synchronized C. murale germination.

Additional key words

catalase gibberelic acid peroxidase superoxide dismutase 

Abbreviations

CAT

catalase

EDTA

ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

GA3

gibberellic acid

POD

peroxidase

ROS

reactive oxygen species

SOD

superoxide dismutase

TEMED

N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylethylenediamine

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Copyright information

© Institute of Experimental Botany, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Praha 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Multidisciplinary ResearchBelgradeSerbia

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