BioMetals

, Volume 20, Issue 5, pp 751–757

Heterozygous tx mice have an increased sensitivity to copper loading: Implications for Wilson’s disease carriers

  • Daphne M. Y. Cheah
  • Yolanda J. Deal
  • Paul F. A. Wright
  • Nicole E. Buck
  • Chung Wo Chow
  • Julian F. B. Mercer
  • Katrina J. Allen
Article

Abstract

Wilson’s disease carriers constitute 1% of the human population. It is unknown whether Wilson’s disease carriers are at increased susceptibility to copper overload when exposed to chronically high levels of ingested copper. This study investigated the effect of chronic excess copper in drinking water on the heterozygous form of the Wilson's disease mouse model – the toxic milk (tx) mouse. Mice were provided with drinking water containing 300 mg/l copper for 4–7, 8–11, 12–15 or 16–20 months. At the completion of the study liver, spleen, kidney and brain tissue were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy to determine copper concentration. Plasma ceruloplasmin oxidase activity and liver histology were also assessed. Chronic copper loading resulted in significantly increased liver copper in both tx heterozygous and tx homozygous mice, while wild type mice were resistant to the effects of copper loading. Copper loading effects were greatest in tx homozygous mice, with increased extrahepatic copper deposition in spleen and kidney – an effect absent in heterozygote and wild type mice. Although liver histology in homozygous mice was markedly abnormal, no histological differences were noted between heterozygous and wild type mice with copper loading. Tx heterozygous mice have a reduced ability to excrete excess copper, indicating that half of the normal liver Atp7b copper transporter activity is insufficient to deal with large copper intakes. Our results suggest that Wilson’s disease carriers in the human population may be at increased risk of copper loading if chronically exposed to elevated copper in food or drinking water.

Keywords

chronic copper exposure Wilson’s disease Wilson’s disease carriers tx mouse Atp7b liver brain 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daphne M. Y. Cheah
    • 1
  • Yolanda J. Deal
    • 2
  • Paul F. A. Wright
    • 3
  • Nicole E. Buck
    • 1
  • Chung Wo Chow
    • 1
    • 4
  • Julian F. B. Mercer
    • 2
  • Katrina J. Allen
    • 1
    • 5
  1. 1.Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Department of PaediatricsUniversity of Melbourne, Royal Children’s HospitalParkvilleAustralia
  2. 2.Centre for Cell and Molecular Biology, School of Life and Environmental SciencesDeakin UniversityBurwoodAustralia
  3. 3.Key Centre for Toxicology, School of Medical SciencesRMIT UniversityBundooraAustralia
  4. 4.Department of Anatomical PathologyRoyal Children’s HospitalParkvilleAustralia
  5. 5.Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical NutritionRoyal Children’s HospitalParkvilleAustralia

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