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Biogeochemistry

, Volume 111, Issue 1–3, pp 715–717 | Cite as

Erratum to: An in-depth look into a tropical lowland forest soil: nitrogen-addition effects on the contents of N2O, CO2 and CH4 and N2O isotopic signatures down to 2-m depth

  • Birgit KoehlerEmail author
  • Marife D. Corre
  • Kristin Steger
  • Reinhard Well
  • Erwin Zehe
  • Juvia P. Sueta
  • Edzo Veldkamp
Erratum
  • 595 Downloads

Erratum to: Biogeochemistry DOI 10.1007/s10533-012-9711-6

The authors would like to make the following corrections to the online published article:

In the calculations of the depth-integrated area-based gas contents in soil air and water we conducted a mistake by summing up the volume-based gas contents and multiplying them with the volumes of the topsoil and subsoil. This resulted in overestimations of the respective values in Table 2. We corrected the integration over depth using the trapezoidal rule, and give the resulting values in the corrected Table 2. A few slight changes in the result paragraphs about the soil gaseous contents are highlighted in bold font in the text below, and the reader is asked to refer to these instead of to the ones in the article. We may not anymore support the statement in the abstract that ‘the pronounced seasonality in soil respiration was largely attributable to enhanced topsoil respiration’ because in the corrected analysis also the subsoil CO2-C contents in the soil air of the control plots were larger during wet than dry season, and the fractions of CO2-C contents in the topsoil were not consistently larger during wet than dry season as previously the case. The respective three sentences in the discussion about the dynamics of carbon dioxide in the control plots (i.e. ‘Soil respiration in the studied lowland forest’ to ‘as well as fine root growth, biomass and turnover during wet than dry season at our site’) are therefore not anymore valid. Also, in the second to last sentence of the discussion section about methane the information in brackets is not anymore valid but this does not change the interpretation. Apart from these, the results, interpretations and conclusions remain unchanged throughout the article.

Abstract

Long-term N-addition did not affect dry-season soil N2O-N contents, increased wet-season soil N2O-N contents, did not affect 15N signatures of NO 3 , and reduced wet-season 15N signatures of N2O compared to the control plots. (…) The N-addition plots showed reduced dry-season topsoil CH4-C contents and threshold CH4 concentrations were reached at a shallower depth compared to the control plots, revealing an N-induced stimulation of methanotrophic activity.

Results

Nitrous oxide

In both treatments, N 2 O-N contents were generally larger during wet than dry season ( P < 0.047, except for the contents in topsoil air in the control plots with P = 0.729; Table 2). Dry-season N2O-N contents did not differ between treatments but wet-season N2O-N contents were larger in the N-addition compared to the control plots in soil air ( P < 0.039) and in subsoil water ( P = 0.009). The fractions of N2O-N contents located in the topsoil did not differ seasonally in either the control or N-addition plots. During dry season, the N 2 O-N fractions located in the topsoil were larger in the control than in the N-addition plots ( P = 0.039; Table  2). In both treatments and seasons, the water phase contained 52–60 % of the overall soil N2O-N contents (Table 2).

Carbon dioxide

In both treatments, topsoil CO 2 -C contents were larger during wet than dry season ( P < 0.044). The same was the case for the subsoil of the control plots ( P < 0.021), and, albeit not significant on the 5 % significance level, a similar trend appeared in the subsoil of the N-addition plots ( P = 0.089 in air and P = 0.052 in water). Seasonal soil CO2-C contents were unaffected by N-addition (Table 2). In the control plots, the fractions of CO 2 -C content located in the topsoil water were larger during wet than dry season ( P = 0.044). They did not differ seasonally in the subsoil water or in soil air, and did not differ in any season or depth in the N-addition plots or between treatments. In both treatments and seasons, the water phase contained 64–69 % of the overall soil CO2-C contents (Table 2).

Methane

In both treatments, CH 4 -C contents in soil air were larger during dry than wet season ( P < 0.028 in the topsoil and P < 0.030 in the subsoil; Table  2) while the contents in soil water did not differ seasonally. Dry-season CH4-C contents in topsoil air were smaller in the N-addition than the control plots by 28 % (P = 0.016). Dry-season CH4-C contents in subsoil air and water and wet-season CH4-C contents did not differ between treatments (Table 2). The fractions of CH4-C content located in the topsoil did not differ seasonally in either the control or N-addition plots, and did not differ between treatments (Table 2). In both treatments and seasons, the water phase contained 5–7 % of the overall soil CH4-C contents (Table 2).
Corrected Table 2

Mean (± SE) N2O-N, CO2-C and CH4-C contents in soil air and water of the topsoil (0.05–0.40 m depth) and subsoil (0.40–2.00 m depth) during dry season (DS) and wet season (WS) in the control and 9–11-year N-addition plots

 

N2O-N (μg m−2)

CO2-C (mg m−2)

CH4-C (μg m−2)

DS

WS

DS

WS

DS

WS

Control

 Contents in soil air

  Topsoil

60.54 ± 1.89

62.54 ± 4.66

135.66 ± 17.49

265.42 ± 38.45

110.54 ± 6.07 (119.75 ± 2.01)

75.61 ± 5.29 (82.56 ± 3.95)

  Subsoil

149.09 ± 8.45

170.85 ± 8.36

616.11 ± 129.89

1,066.01 ± 165.36

199.61 ± 8.88 (233.48 ± 32.22)

150.48 ± 4.17 (182.67 ± 19.15)

  Fraction located in the topsoil (%)

28.94 ± 0.71

26.81 ± 1.63

18.83 ± 3.02

20.61 ± 4.10

35.65 ± 1.65 (34.43 ± 2.84)

33.42 ± 2.17 (31.52 ± 3.41)

 Contents in soil water

  Topsoil

37.21 ± 1.96

62.41 ± 4.46

115.46 ± 17.13

381.26 ± 50.63

3.74 ± 0.11 (4.02 ± 0.20)

4.25 ± 0.31 (4.52 ± 0.26)

  Subsoil

190.02 ± 9.42

286.46 ± 11.91

1,202.38 ± 245.47

2,592.22 ± 412.29

13.62 ± 0.94 (15.63 ± 2.15)

13.58 ± 0.61 (16.23 ± 1.80)

  Fraction located in the topsoil (%)

16.39 ± 0.60

17.96 ± 1.63

9.27 ± 1.93

13.57 ± 3.16

21.65 ± 0.89 (20.81 ± 1.53)

23.85 ± 1.50 (22.16 ± 2.54)

Nitrogen addition

 Contents in soil air

  Topsoil

51.16 ± 3.55

88.99 ± 7.37

125.27 ± 14.77

270.47 ± 29.14

80.05 ± 8.26 (81.85 ± 6.53)

66.71 ± 5.99 (70.09 ± 4.30)

  Subsoil

154.70 ± 19.90

281.22 ± 20.16

518.31 ± 32.10

1,054.21 ± 175.62

158.07 ± 18.36 (160.75 ± 15.56)

129.77 ± 16.06 (147.38 ± 9.52)

  Fraction located in the topsoil (%)

25.09 ± 1.04

24.15 ± 2.32

19.34 ± 1.03

20.79 ± 1.22

33.69 ± 0.94 (33.81 ± 1.01)

34.14 ± 1.63 (32.29 ± 1.90)

 Contents in soil water

  Topsoil

43.00 ± 2.31

78.09 ± 7.45

148.13 ± 24.42

330.15 ± 37.69

3.84 ± 0.24 (3.98 ± 0.26)

3.35 ± 0.38 (3.59 ± 0.25)

  Subsoil

237.20 ± 14.50

450.10 ± 38.74

1,212.34 ± 110.81

2,451.40 ± 373.71

12.78 ± 1.14 (13.14 ± 0.81)

10.63 ± 1.62 (12.14 ± 1.10)

  Fraction located in the topsoil (%)

15.43 ± 1.15

14.95 ± 1.90

10.77 ± 0.75

12.11 ± 1.13

23.23 ± 1.38 (23.32 ± 1.42)

24.19 ± 0.96 (22.92 ± 1.26)

To calculate contents in soil water, equilibrium between gaseous and aqueous phase was assumed. For CH4-C, analyses were conducted separately excluding the occasional high concentrations (please see the “Statistical analyses” section and Table 3) and for the whole data set (values given in parentheses)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Birgit Koehler
    • 1
    Email author
  • Marife D. Corre
    • 2
  • Kristin Steger
    • 1
    • 5
  • Reinhard Well
    • 3
  • Erwin Zehe
    • 4
  • Juvia P. Sueta
    • 2
  • Edzo Veldkamp
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Limnology, Evolutionary Biology CentreUppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden
  2. 2.Buesgen Institute, Soil Science of Tropical and Subtropical EcosystemsGeorg-August-University of GoettingenGoettingenGermany
  3. 3.Johann Heinrich von Thünen-Institut, Federal Research Institute for Rural Areas, Forestry and FisheriesInstitute of Agricultural Climate ResearchBraunschweigGermany
  4. 4.Karlsruhe Institute of TechnologyInstitute of Water Resources and River Basin ManagementKarlsruheGermany
  5. 5.Indo-German Centre for SustainabilityIndian Institute of Technology MadrasChennaiIndia

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