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Biodiversity and Conservation

, Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 407–409 | Cite as

Brazil’s mining code under attack: giant mining companies impose unprecedented risk to biodiversity

  • Renata M. S. A. Meira
  • Ariane L. Peixoto
  • Marcus A. N. Coelho
  • Andréa P. L. Ponzo
  • Vânia G. L. Esteves
  • Micheline C. Silva
  • Paulo E. A. S. Câmara
  • João A. A. Meira-Neto
Letter to the Editor

Brazil owns one of the largest biodiversity in the world. It has the largest area of tropical forests, the most biodiverse tropical savanna and is one of the countries that have experienced very significant economic growth during the twentieth Century and the beginning of the twenty-first Century. It is among the top ten economies of the world, largely based on environmental resources and commodities production. Two main environmental laws from 1960’s, the Forest Code and the Mining Code, have imposed restrictions to the use of natural resources by landholders and companies up to the 2010’s. In 2012, however, big companies and political lobbies have succeeded to change the Forest Code and are threatening the sibling Mining Code.

In 2012, the Farm Lobby, formed by landholders and representatives, has politically influenced the Brazilian Congress towards important changes in the Brazilian environmental code (Stickler et al. 2013). The lobby has benefitted from the twentieth century’s...

Keywords

Coral Reef Vale Mining Waste Mining Company Environmental Disaster 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Renata M. S. A. Meira
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ariane L. Peixoto
    • 1
    • 3
  • Marcus A. N. Coelho
    • 1
    • 3
  • Andréa P. L. Ponzo
    • 1
    • 4
  • Vânia G. L. Esteves
    • 1
    • 5
  • Micheline C. Silva
    • 1
    • 6
  • Paulo E. A. S. Câmara
    • 1
    • 6
  • João A. A. Meira-Neto
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Sociedade Botânica do Brasil, Ed. Constrol CenterBrasíliaBrazil
  2. 2.Universidade Federal de ViçosaViçosaBrazil
  3. 3.Instituto de Pesquisas Jardim Botânico do Rio de JaneiroRio De JaneiroBrazil
  4. 4.Universidade Federal de Juiz de ForaJuiz De ForaBrazil
  5. 5.Universidade Federal do Rio de JaneiroRio De JaneiroBrazil
  6. 6.Universidade de BrasíliaBrasíliaBrazil

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