Biodiversity and Conservation

, Volume 17, Issue 14, pp 3513–3530

Monitoring crayfish using a mark-recapture method: potentials, recommendations, and limitations

  • Piotr Nowicki
  • Tina Tirelli
  • Rocco Mussat Sartor
  • Francesca Bona
  • Daniela Pessani
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10531-008-9425-1

Cite this article as:
Nowicki, P., Tirelli, T., Mussat Sartor, R. et al. Biodivers Conserv (2008) 17: 3513. doi:10.1007/s10531-008-9425-1

Abstract

Crayfish are regarded as useful indicators of environmental quality and freshwater biodiversity. However, reliable methods for monitoring their populations are needed so that this potential can be fully utilised. We report and discuss methodological aspects of the white-clawed crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes complex) survey conducted in Piedmont, Italy, with the use of mark-recapture. The results suggest that the method can serve as a convenient tool for estimating the size of crayfish populations and inferring their temporal trends. The two populations investigated appeared closed except for wintertime and July. Consequently, the Robust Design, which is regarded as the most reliable mark-recapture approach, can be easily applied. The minimum effective sampling plan for monitoring purposes should comprise one primary period per year, conducted in the summer–autumn season, and consisting of three capture sessions. If gaining insight into the ecology of the investigated species is the prime objective and sufficient resources are available, the optimal plan should include two primary periods (in spring and the summer–autumn season) of five capture sessions each. Capture sessions need to be separated by roughly 2-week intervals in order to avoid the strong, but short-term, negative effect of capturing crayfish on their recapture chances. As the model without heterogeneity in capture probabilities ensures better estimate precision we recommend that data collected for both sexes are analysed separately. Taking into consideration higher male catchabilities and sex ratio being invariably 1:1, it also seems beneficial to estimate only male numbers and double them to achieve total population sizes.

Keywords

Austropotamobius pallipes complex Jolly-Seber model Model selection Population size estimation Relative abundance methods Robust design Sampling intensity Survival patterns 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Piotr Nowicki
    • 1
  • Tina Tirelli
    • 2
  • Rocco Mussat Sartor
    • 2
  • Francesca Bona
    • 2
  • Daniela Pessani
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Environmental SciencesJagiellonian UniversityKrakowPoland
  2. 2.Dipartimento di Biologia Animale e dell’UomoUniversity of TurinTorinoItaly

Personalised recommendations