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Biodiversity and Conservation

, Volume 16, Issue 14, pp 3963–3991 | Cite as

Naturally occurring wild relatives of temperate fruits in Western Himalayan region of India: an analysis

  • Jai Chand RanaEmail author
  • K. Pradheep
  • V. D. Verma
Original paper

Abstract

Wild relatives (WR) of temperate fruits belonging to genera viz., Malus, Prunus, Pyrus, Vitis, Rubus, Fragaria and others showed a wide range of diversity thereby possibility of utilizing large numbers of desirable genes/traits particularly the resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses which is generally lacking in their cultivated allies. About 55 WR of 23 temperate fruits, occurring in WH, including those naturalized, are discussed. Wild forms of crops such as Asiatic pear, apricot, Japanese plum, peach, walnut and pomegranate, blackberry, black and redcurrant existing in WH are also narrated. Wild relatives, their area of distribution, important traits, utilization potential and possible strategies for their effective conservation and utilization have been discussed.

Keywords

Genetic diversity Wild relatives Primitive form Temperate fruits Western Himalaya 

Abbreviations

CN

Collection number

IC

Indigenous collection

MSL

Mean sea level

IARIHRS

Indian Agricultural Research Institute Horticulture Research Station

IIAS

Indian Institute of Advance Study

NBPGRRS

National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources Regional Station

NBPGR

National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources

NHCP

National Herbarium of Cultivated Plants

SHM

Shimla

HN

Herbarium number

HP

Himachal Pradesh

J&K

Jammu & Kashmir

UKD

Uttarakhand

WH

Western Himalaya

WR

Wild relatives

vit. C

Vitamin C

TSS

Total soluble solids

yrs

Years

h

Hours

cvs.

Cultivars

Symbols and units

°C

Degree centigrade

m

Meter(s)

%

Percent

&

And

kg

Kilogram

mg

Milligram

cm

Centimeter(s)

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources Regional StationPhagli, ShimlaIndia

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