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A case of fallacy in scientific discourse?

  • Christy LeppanenEmail author
  • Daniel Simberloff
Original Paper
  • 57 Downloads

“When you don’t have evidence, you use theatrics.”

-Roger Jason Stone, Cuomo Prime Time, CNN

Salom et al. (2019) claim that Media representation of hemlock woolly adelgid management risks: a case study of science communication and invasive species control (Leppanen et al. 2018a) is based on a deeply flawed analysis and misrepresentation of scientific literature. Leppanen et al. (2018a) found that “media articles about managing a devastating forest insect, the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae), revealed that uncertainties and value judgments associated with claims of success were usually obscured or omitted, legitimate disagreement among experts about efficacy was omitted, and risks to non-targets were usually unaddressed” (Leppanen et al. 2018a). Responding to Leppanen et al. (2018a), Salom et al. (2019) build a fallacious argument based on untruths and half-truths supported by omissions, misinterpretations, and selective use of text out of context.

Deeply flawed analysis

Salom...

Keywords

Adelges tsugae Biocontrol Fallacy Hemlock Hemlock woolly adelgid Response to Salom Science communication Tsuga 

Notes

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA

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