Detection and eradication of a non-native Collembola incursion in a hydroponics facility in East Antarctica

  • Dana M. Bergstrom
  • Andrew Sharman
  • Justine D. Shaw
  • Melissa Houghton
  • Charlene Janion-Scheepers
  • Helen Achurch
  • Aleks Terauds
Invasion Note

Abstract

A non-native incursion of the collembolan, Xenylla sp. was found within the hydroponics facility at Davis Station, East Antarctica in May 2014. A rapid response was implemented to eradicate the incursion, including localised insecticide use, incineration of plants and growing media, sterilisation of the facility and three cycles of freezing/thawing of both internal rooms and external sub floor areas. Two consecutive years of summer monitoring programs have not detected any Collembola in station buildings or in the surrounding environment, suggesting the eradication was successful. This case highlights the importance of a multiple barrier approach to non-native species risks, and how activation of the last barrier—regular surveillance—resulted in early detection. The use of an online, real-time incident reporting system facilitated efficient communication between scientific experts, operational managers and expeditioners on site, resulting in a rapid and effective response following detection and potentially the first successful eradication of a non-native microarthropod in Antarctica. Monitoring will continue to confirm eradication.

Keywords

Springtail Non-native species Early detection Rapid response Surveillance DNA barcoding 

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dana M. Bergstrom
    • 1
  • Andrew Sharman
    • 1
  • Justine D. Shaw
    • 2
  • Melissa Houghton
    • 1
    • 2
  • Charlene Janion-Scheepers
    • 3
  • Helen Achurch
    • 1
  • Aleks Terauds
    • 1
  1. 1.Australian Antarctic DivisionKingstonAustralia
  2. 2.School of Biological SciencesThe University of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia
  3. 3.School of Biological SciencesMonash UniversityClaytonAustralia

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