Challenges in confirming eradication success of invasive red-eared sliders

  • Pablo García-Díaz
  • David S. L. Ramsey
  • Andrew P. Woolnough
  • Marc Franch
  • Gustavo A. Llorente
  • Albert Montori
  • Xabier Buenetxea
  • Asier R. Larrinaga
  • Matthieu Lasceve
  • Alberto Álvarez
  • José María Traverso
  • Aitor Valdeón
  • Ariñe Crespo
  • Virginia Rada
  • Enrique Ayllón
  • Vicente Sancho
  • J. Ignacio Lacomba
  • José Vicente Bataller
  • Miguel Lizana
Original Paper

Abstract

Confirming eradication success can be notoriously difficult and costly, especially when the species is still present but remains undetected, due to very low population densities and imperfect detection methods. There has been a lack of research on appropriate guidelines and estimation procedures for declaring eradication success for programs aimed at eradicating alien reptiles. Here we develop quantitative rules for confirmation monitoring in eradication campaigns of the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans). We used a database of slider trapping data from control and eradication campaigns conducted in localities across the Iberian Peninsula and southern France to construct models for inferring appropriate trapping efforts for confirming slider turtle eradication. Basking traps were slightly more efficient than net traps in capturing sliders, although trapping was an inefficient monitoring method given the low capture probabilities estimated. The results of our spatially-explicit eradication scenarios revealed the importance of habitat configuration in declaring eradication success. Declaration of eradication success is contingent on the thresholds set to minimise false positives (i.e., falsely declaring eradication successful), but in any scenario large trapping efforts were required to confirm eradication. Given the low estimated capture probabilities, alternative methods such as eDNA and visual surveys should be considered for monitoring sliders. We suggest that if the costs associated with the impact of alien sliders can be adequately estimated, then eradication can be confirmed by rules minimising both false positive and negative error rates. Otherwise, rules minimising false positive errors would be more appropriate.

Keywords

Alien reptile Capture probability Environmental decision-making False positive Monitoring Trachemys scripta elegans 

Supplementary material

10530_2017_1480_MOESM1_ESM.docx (21 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 21 kb)
10530_2017_1480_MOESM2_ESM.docx (2.4 mb)
Supplementary material 2 (DOCX 2414 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pablo García-Díaz
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • David S. L. Ramsey
    • 4
  • Andrew P. Woolnough
    • 5
  • Marc Franch
    • 6
    • 7
  • Gustavo A. Llorente
    • 6
  • Albert Montori
    • 6
  • Xabier Buenetxea
    • 8
  • Asier R. Larrinaga
    • 9
  • Matthieu Lasceve
    • 10
  • Alberto Álvarez
    • 11
  • José María Traverso
    • 11
  • Aitor Valdeón
    • 12
    • 13
  • Ariñe Crespo
    • 13
  • Virginia Rada
    • 13
  • Enrique Ayllón
    • 11
  • Vicente Sancho
    • 14
  • J. Ignacio Lacomba
    • 15
  • José Vicente Bataller
    • 16
  • Miguel Lizana
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Biological Sciences and Centre for Conservation Science and Technology (CCoST)The University of AdelaideNorth TerraceAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Animal BiologyUniversity of SalamancaSalamancaSpain
  3. 3.Landcare ResearchLincolnNew Zealand
  4. 4.Arthur Rylah Institute, Department of Land, Water and EnvironmentHeidelbergAustralia
  5. 5.Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport and ResourcesAttwoodAustralia
  6. 6.Section of Zoology and Anthropology, Department of Evolutionary Biology, Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of BiologyUniversity of BarcelonaBarcelonaSpain
  7. 7.CICGE - Centro de Investigação em Ciências Geo-Espaciais Observatório Astronómico Prof. Manuel de Barros Alameda do Monte da VirgemVila Nova de GaiaPortugal
  8. 8.BOLUE Ingurumen IkerketakGamiz-FikaSpain
  9. 9.eNeBaDaAríns - Santiago de CompostelaSpain
  10. 10.Toulon Provence Méditerranée, Communauté d’AgglomérationToulonFrance
  11. 11.Asociación Herpetológica EspañolaLeganésSpain
  12. 12.Departamento de Geografía y Ordenación del Territorio, Instituto de Investigación en Ciencias Ambientales (IUCA)Universidad de ZaragozaZaragozaSpain
  13. 13.Department of HerpetologyAranzadi Society of SciencesDonostia-San SebastiánSpain
  14. 14.LIFE+Trachemys Project, Wildlife ServiceRegional Ministry of Environment, Generalitat ValencianaValenciaSpain
  15. 15.Direcció General de Medi Natural, Generalitat ValencianaValenciaSpain
  16. 16.Freshwater Species Conservation Centre, Wildlife Service, Regional Ministry of EnvironmentVAERSA-Generalitat ValencianaEl SalerSpain

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