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Biological Invasions

, Volume 20, Issue 1, pp 1–4 | Cite as

Pathogen accumulation cannot undo the impact of invasive species

  • Nahuel Policelli
  • Mariana C. Chiuffo
  • Jaime Moyano
  • Agostina Torres
  • Mariano A. Rodriguez-Cabal
  • Martín A. Nuñez
Flashpoints

Pathogen accumulation can decrease, increase, or not change invasive species abundance, but their impacts may persist in all scenarios.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nahuel Policelli
    • 1
  • Mariana C. Chiuffo
    • 1
  • Jaime Moyano
    • 1
  • Agostina Torres
    • 1
  • Mariano A. Rodriguez-Cabal
    • 1
  • Martín A. Nuñez
    • 1
  1. 1.Grupo de Ecología de Invasiones, INIBIOMAUniversidad Nacional del Comahue, CONICETSan Carlos de BarilocheArgentina

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