Biological Invasions

, Volume 16, Issue 12, pp 2495–2505 | Cite as

GB Non-native Species Information Portal: documenting the arrival of non-native species in Britain

  • Helen E. Roy
  • Chris D. Preston
  • Colin A. Harrower
  • Stephanie L. Rorke
  • David Noble
  • Jack Sewell
  • Kevin Walker
  • John Marchant
  • Becky Seeley
  • John Bishop
  • Alison Jukes
  • Andy Musgrove
  • David Pearman
  • Olaf Booy
Invasion Note

Abstract

Information on non-native species (NNS) is often scattered among a multitude of sources, such as regional and national databases, peer-reviewed and grey literature, unpublished research projects, institutional datasets and with taxonomic experts. Here we report on the development of a database designed for the collation of information in Britain. The project involved working with volunteer experts to populate a database of NNS (hereafter called “the species register”). Each species occupies a row within the database with information on aspects of the species’ biology such as environment (marine, freshwater, terrestrial etc.), functional type (predator, parasite etc.), habitats occupied in the invaded range (using EUNIS classification), invasion pathways, establishment status in Britain and impacts. The information is delivered through the Great Britain Non-Native Species Information Portal hosted by the Non-Native Species Secretariat. By the end of 2011 there were 1958 established NNS in Britain. There has been a dramatic increase over time in the rate of NNS arriving in Britain and those becoming established. The majority of established NNS are higher plants (1,376 species). Insects are the next most numerous group (344 species) followed by non-insect invertebrates (158 species), vertebrates (50 species), algae (24 species) and lower plants (6 species). Inventories of NNS are seen as an essential tool in the management of biological invasions. The use of such lists is diverse and far-reaching. However, the increasing number of new arrivals highlights both the dynamic nature of invasions and the importance of updating NNS inventories.

Keywords

Inventories Non-native species Database Pathways Freshwater Terrestrial Marine 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helen E. Roy
    • 1
  • Chris D. Preston
    • 1
  • Colin A. Harrower
    • 1
  • Stephanie L. Rorke
    • 1
  • David Noble
    • 2
  • Jack Sewell
    • 3
  • Kevin Walker
    • 4
    • 5
  • John Marchant
    • 2
  • Becky Seeley
    • 3
  • John Bishop
    • 3
  • Alison Jukes
    • 4
  • Andy Musgrove
    • 2
  • David Pearman
    • 4
  • Olaf Booy
    • 6
  1. 1.Centre for Ecology and HydrologyWallingfordUK
  2. 2.British Trust for OrnithologyThetfordUK
  3. 3.Marine Biological Association of the United KingdomPlymouthUK
  4. 4.Botanical Society of the British IslesHarrogateUK
  5. 5.Department of BiologyUniversity of YorkYorkUK
  6. 6.Non-Native Species SecretariatSand Hutton, YorkUK

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