Biological Invasions

, Volume 16, Issue 9, pp 1979–1990

Long-term legacies and partial recovery of mycorrhizal communities after invasive plant removal

  • Richard A. Lankau
  • Jonathan T. Bauer
  • M. Rebecca Anderson
  • Roger C. Anderson
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10530-014-0642-0

Cite this article as:
Lankau, R.A., Bauer, J.T., Anderson, M.R. et al. Biol Invasions (2014) 16: 1979. doi:10.1007/s10530-014-0642-0

Abstract

Invasive plants can have strong impacts on native communities, which have prompted intense efforts at invasive removal. However, relatively little is known about how native communities will reassemble after a dominant invader has been removed from the system. Legacy effects of invasive plants on soil microbial communities may alter native plant community reassembly long after the invader is gone. Here we found that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) communities have shown some recovery in experimental plots following 6 years of removal of the invasive Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard, a species known to degrade AMF communities) in terms of taxonomic richness and community composition. However, despite this recovery, the density of A. petiolata at the beginning of the experiment (in 2004) still correlated with lower AMF richness and altered community composition after 6 years of annual weeding, suggesting long-term legacies of dense A. petiolata infestations. Because native plant and mycorrhizal fungal communities may show interdependence, reassembly of one community may be limited by the reassembly of the other. Restoration may be more effective if practices address both communities simultaneously.

Keywords

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Alliaria petiolata Restoration T-RFLP Soil microbial community 

Supplementary material

10530_2014_642_MOESM1_ESM.docx (19 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 19 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard A. Lankau
    • 1
  • Jonathan T. Bauer
    • 2
    • 3
  • M. Rebecca Anderson
    • 3
  • Roger C. Anderson
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Plant Biology, 2502 Miller Plant SciencesUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiologyIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA
  3. 3.School of Biological SciencesIllinois State UniversityNormalUSA

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