Biological Invasions

, Volume 11, Issue 10, pp 2401–2414

Niche based distribution modelling of an invasive alien plant: effects of population status, propagule pressure and invasion history

  • Stefan Dullinger
  • Ingrid Kleinbauer
  • Johannes Peterseil
  • Manfred Smolik
  • Franz Essl
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10530-009-9424-5

Cite this article as:
Dullinger, S., Kleinbauer, I., Peterseil, J. et al. Biol Invasions (2009) 11: 2401. doi:10.1007/s10530-009-9424-5

Abstract

Forecasting the spatial spread of invasive species is important to inform management planning. Niche-based species distribution models offer a well-developed framework for assessing the potential range of species. However, these models assume equilibrium between the species’ distribution and its ecological requirements. During range expansion, invasive species are not in such equilibrium due to both dispersal limitation and frequent casual occurrence in sites unsuitable to persistent populations. In this article we use the example of the invasive annual plant Ambrosia artemisiifolia in Austria to evaluate if model accuracy can be enhanced in such non-equilibrium situations by taking account of propagule pressure and by restricting model calibration to naturalized populations. Moreover, we test if model accuracy increases during invasion history using distribution data from 1984 to 2005. The results suggest that models calibrated with naturalized populations are much more accurate than those based on the total set of records. Proxies of propagule pressure slightly but significantly improve goodness of fit, accuracy, and Type I and II error rates of models calibrated with all available records but have less consistent effects on models of naturalized populations. Model accuracy did not increase during the recent invasion history, probably because the species is still far from an equilibrium distribution. We conclude that even a coarse assessment of population status with records of invasive species delivers important information for predictive modelling and that proxies of propagule pressure should be included into such models at least during early to intermediate stages of the invasion history.

Keywords

Alien plants Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. Invasion Naturalization Propagule pressure Species distribution models 

Abbreviations

A

Autologistic variable

AUC

Area under the receiver operating curve

CA

Percentage area of calcareous substrates

CU

Curvature

DEM

Digital elevation model

FMA

Floristic Mapping of Austria

GAM

Generalized Additive Model

GBM

Gradient Boosting Machines

GLM

Generalized Linear Model

IAS

Invasive alien species

LC

Percentage area of human settlements and agricultural fields

PW

Precipitation sum of the winter months

S

Length of major streets

SENS

Sensitivity

SPEC

Specificity

T7

Mean monthly temperature of July

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefan Dullinger
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ingrid Kleinbauer
    • 1
    • 2
  • Johannes Peterseil
    • 3
  • Manfred Smolik
    • 4
  • Franz Essl
    • 3
  1. 1.Vienna Institute for Nature Conservation and AnalysesViennaAustria
  2. 2.Faculty of Life SciencesUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria
  3. 3.Federal Environment AgencyViennaAustria
  4. 4.Faculty of PhysicsUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria

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