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Biological Invasions

, Volume 8, Issue 2, pp 117–123 | Cite as

Tetramorium tsushimae, a New Invasive Ant in North America

  • Florian M. Steiner
  • Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner
  • James C. Trager
  • Karl Moder
  • Matthias Sanetra
  • Erhard Christian
  • Christian Stauffer
Article

Abstract

Combining molecular and morphological evidence, an invasive ant in Missouri and Illinois, USA, is identified as Tetramorium tsushimae Emery, 1925, a polygynous-polycalic species native to East Asia. T. tsushimae is recorded as invasive for the first time. RFLP and worker morphometrics provide tools for reliable determination. Mitochondrial DNA data reveal the probable geographic origin of the invasive populations to be Japan.

Keywords

invasive ant morphometry mtDNA polygyny-polycaly RFLP Tetramorium caespitum Tetramorium tsushimae 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Florian M. Steiner
    • 1
    • 2
  • Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner
    • 1
    • 2
  • James C. Trager
    • 3
  • Karl Moder
    • 4
  • Matthias Sanetra
    • 5
  • Erhard Christian
    • 1
  • Christian Stauffer
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Integrative Biology, Institute of Zoology, BokuUniversity of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences ViennaViennaAustria
  2. 2.Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, Institute of Forest Entomology, Forest Pathology and Forest Protection, BokuUniversity of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences ViennaViennaAustria
  3. 3.Shaw Nature ReserveGray SummitUSA
  4. 4.Department of Spatial-, Landscape-, and Infrastructure-Sciences, Institute of Applied Statistics and Computing, BokuUniversity of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences ViennaViennaAustria
  5. 5.Zoology and Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of KonstanzKonstanzGermany

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