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Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 37, Issue 11, pp 2349–2355 | Cite as

Improved properties of bone and cartilage tissue from 3D inkjet-bioprinted human mesenchymal stem cells by simultaneous deposition and photocrosslinking in PEG-GelMA

  • Guifang Gao
  • Arndt F. Schilling
  • Karen Hubbell
  • Tomo Yonezawa
  • Danh Truong
  • Yi Hong
  • Guohao Dai
  • Xiaofeng CuiEmail author
Original Research Paper

Abstract

Objectives

Bioprinting of bone and cartilage suffers from low mechanical properties. Here we have developed a unique inkjet bioprinting approach of creating mechanically strong bone and cartilage tissue constructs using poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate, gelatin methacrylate, and human MSCs.

Results

The printed hMSCs were evenly distributed in the polymerized PEG-GelMA scaffold during layer-by-layer assembly. The procedure showed a good biocompatibility with >80% of the cells surviving the printing process and the resulting constructs provided strong mechanical support to the embedded cells. The printed mesenchymal stem cells showed an excellent osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation capacity. Both osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation as determined by specific gene and protein expression analysis (RUNX2, SP7, DLX5, ALPL, Col1A1, IBSP, BGLAP, SPP1, Col10A1, MMP13, SOX9, Col2A1, ACAN) was improved by PEG-GelMA in comparison to PEG alone. These observations were consistent with the histological evaluation.

Conclusions

Inkjet bioprinted-hMSCs in simultaneously photocrosslinked PEG-GelMA hydrogel scaffolds demonstrated an improvement of mechanical properties and osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation, suggesting its promising potential for usage in bone and cartilage tissue engineering.

Keywords

Bone Cartilage Hydrogel Inkjet bioprinting Mesenchymal stem cells Photopolymerization 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to acknowledge M.G. Finn, Kurt Breitenkamp, Lilo Creighton, Vivian Lee, Taylor Dorsey, and Diana Kim for constructive suggestions and technical support. This work was funded by New York Capital Region Research Alliance Grant, the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (WUT: 2015IB004), NSF 1011796, and Stemorgan Therapeutics R&D support (TERM002). The authors have no financial or commercial conflict of interest to declare.

Supplementary information

Supplementary Table 1—Engineering parameters of a modified HP DeskJet 500 printer and mass swelling ratio (Q) and equilibrium water content (M) of printed 10 % w/v PEGDMA (PEG), and 10 % w/v PEG with 1.5 % w/v GelMA (PEG-GelMA) (n = 3).

Supplementary material

10529_2015_1921_MOESM1_ESM.doc (25 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 25 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guifang Gao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Arndt F. Schilling
    • 3
  • Karen Hubbell
    • 2
  • Tomo Yonezawa
    • 4
    • 5
  • Danh Truong
    • 6
  • Yi Hong
    • 6
  • Guohao Dai
    • 7
  • Xiaofeng Cui
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 7
    Email author
  1. 1.School of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Life SciencesWuhan University of TechnologyWuhanChina
  2. 2.Stemorgan TherapeuticsAlbanyUSA
  3. 3.Clinic for Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, Klinikum Rechts der IsarTechnical University MunichMunichGermany
  4. 4.Department of Molecular and Experimental MedicineThe Scripps Research InstituteSan DiegoUSA
  5. 5.Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutic Innovation, Graduate School of Biomedical SciencesNagasaki UniversityNagasakiJapan
  6. 6.Department of BioengineeringUniversity of Texas at ArlingtonArlingtonUSA
  7. 7.Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary StudiesRensselaer Polytechnic InstituteTroyUSA

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