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Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 37, Issue 7, pp 1399–1404 | Cite as

Construction of a biocathode using the multicopper oxidase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrobaculum aerophilum: towards a long-life biobattery

  • Hiroaki Sakamoto
  • Toshiki Uchii
  • Kayo Yamaguchi
  • Ayako Koto
  • Ei-ichiro Takamura
  • Takenori Satomura
  • Haruhiko Sakuraba
  • Toshihisa Ohshima
  • Shin-ichiro SuyeEmail author
Original Research Paper

Abstract

Objectives

The life of biobatteries remains an issue due to loss of enzyme activity over time. In this study, we sought to develop a biobattery with a long life using a hyperthermophilic enzyme.

Results

We hypothesized that use of such hyperthermophilic enzymes would allow for the biofuel cells to have a long battery life. Using pyrroloquinoline quinone-glucose dehydrogenase and the multicopper oxidase from Pyrobaculum aerophilum, we constructed an anode and cathode. The maximum output was 11 μW at 0.2 V, and the stability of the both electrode was maintained at 70 % after 14 days.

Conclusion

The biofuel cells that use hyperthermophilic enzymes may prolong their life.

Keywords

Bio-fuel cells Carbon nanotube Glucose dehydrogenase Hyperthermophilic enzyme Multicopper oxidase Pyrroloquinoline quinone Surface modification 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) KAKENHI (23510127) Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroaki Sakamoto
    • 1
  • Toshiki Uchii
    • 2
  • Kayo Yamaguchi
    • 2
  • Ayako Koto
    • 3
  • Ei-ichiro Takamura
    • 3
  • Takenori Satomura
    • 2
  • Haruhiko Sakuraba
    • 4
  • Toshihisa Ohshima
    • 5
  • Shin-ichiro Suye
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.Tenure-Track Program for Innovative ResearchUniversity of FukuiFukuiJapan
  2. 2.Department of Applied Chemistry and Biotechnology, Graduate School of EngineeringUniversity of FukuiFukuiJapan
  3. 3.Department of Frontier Fiber Technology and Science, Graduate School of EngineeringUniversity of FukuiFukuiJapan
  4. 4.Department of Applied Biological Science, Faculty of AgricultureKagawa UniversityKagawaJapan
  5. 5.Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of EngineeringOsaka Institute of TechnologyOsakaJapan

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