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Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 37, Issue 1, pp 205–209 | Cite as

Metabolomic fingerprinting of primed tobacco cells provide the first evidence for the biological origin of cis-chlorogenic acid

  • M. I. Mhlongo
  • L. A. Piater
  • P. A. Steenkamp
  • N. E. Madala
  • I. A. DuberyEmail author
Original Research Paper

Abstract

Previous studies suggest that only trans-isomers of chlorogenic acid (CGA) are naturally produced. Cis-isomers have been noted in some plant tissues exposed to different mechanical processes as well as untreated tobacco leaves exposed to sunlight. Very little, however, is known about the biological significance and origin of cis-isomers. Here we show for the first time the accumulation of cis-5-caffeoylquinic acid in cultured tobacco cells treated with different inducers of plant defence (lipopolysaccharides, flagellin peptide-22, chitosan, acibenzolar-S-methyl and isonitrosoacetophenone), without exposure to UV light and with a 2-fold (on average) increase in the concentration of the pool in comparison to non-stimulated cells. Our UHPLC–Q-TOF-MS and multivariate statistical results suggest the presence of a possible biological pathway responsible for the production of cis-CGAs in tobacco plants.

Keywords

Cis-5-caffeoylquinic acid Chlorogenic acids Natural products Phytoanticipins Plants Secondary metabolism Tobacco cells 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported in part by the South African National Research Foundation (NRF) and the University of Johannesburg.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. I. Mhlongo
    • 1
  • L. A. Piater
    • 1
  • P. A. Steenkamp
    • 1
    • 2
  • N. E. Madala
    • 1
  • I. A. Dubery
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of JohannesburgAuckland ParkSouth Africa
  2. 2.Natural Product GroupCSIR BiosciencesPretoriaSouth Africa

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