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Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 36, Issue 4, pp 859–868 | Cite as

Modification to the injection needle to a screw needle improves effective cell delivery in acute myocardial infarction

  • Ki-Sung Hong
  • Ki-Hyun Byun
  • Joseph Seo
  • Hye-jin Lee
  • Jong-jin Choi
  • Kyung Sul Kim
  • Youngsok Choi
  • Sung-Hwan Moon
  • Hyung-Min ChungEmail author
Original Research Paper

Abstract

Evaluation of therapeutic effects of transplanted cells in ischemic heart failure models are important issues. However, traditional injection needles that are widely used in clinical practice tend to reduce the amount of functional cells relative to the injected amount. We now describe a cell transplantation technique using a screw needle. After inducing acute myocardial infarction in a rat model, human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells were injected into the infarcted regions with a screw or straight-curved needle. When an equal volume of cells was transplanted, the screw group suffered minimal cell loss, showed improvement in LV wall thickness (74.5 ± 6.2 vs. 64.4 ± 7.8 %), epicardium scar length (19.3 ± 2.8 vs. 24.6 ± 6.4 %), and area of engraft. Thus, even a simple change in the structure of an instrument can have a large impact on transplantation efficiency.

Keywords

Cell transplantation Endothelial cells Injection needles Ischemic heart failure Myocardial infarction Screw needle 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported by a grant (10033642) from the Industry Sources Development Project and funded by the Ministry of Knowledge Economy. In addition, this research was supported by the Bio & Medical Technology Development Program of the National Research Foundation (NRF) funded by the Korean government (MEST) (2012-0006107).

Supplementary material

10529_2013_1414_MOESM1_ESM.tif (5.4 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (TIFF 5575 kb) Quantification of microvessel density. Tissue sections stained with the SMA antibody. (a and b) Comparison of the microvessel density of the infarct regions in the screw group (a) and straight-curved group (b). Scale bar, 100 μm. (c) The microvessels were counted under a light microscope (200x magnification), and five fields from seven samples were randomly selected for counting. (d) Quantification of the SMA-positive microvessels per mm2 for each needle group. *p < 0.05 vs. MI
10529_2013_1414_MOESM2_ESM.tif (6.2 mb)
Supplementary material 2 (TIFF 6380 kb) A new approach for cell transplantation using the screw needle. (a) Fabrication of a biocompatible and biodegradable screw-needle tip with pores (black arrowheads). (b) The volume and location of the injected cells can be adjusted by the use of needle tip pores in the MI regions. The needle can be cut at the indicated site for simple, safe, and effective transplantation, achieving a one-step delivery procedure. This novel strategy leads to direct cell replacement and limits fibrosis while also facilitating endogenous cellular regeneration and vasculo-cardiomyogenesis

Supplementary material 3 (MPG 3844 kb) Cell transplantation for the treatment of myocardial infarction using a straight-curved needle

Supplementary material 4 (MPG 4196 kb) Cell transplantation for the treatment of myocardial infarction using a screw needle

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ki-Sung Hong
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ki-Hyun Byun
    • 3
  • Joseph Seo
    • 4
  • Hye-jin Lee
    • 1
  • Jong-jin Choi
    • 4
  • Kyung Sul Kim
    • 1
  • Youngsok Choi
    • 1
  • Sung-Hwan Moon
    • 4
  • Hyung-Min Chung
    • 4
    Email author
  1. 1.Stem Cell Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Science, CHA Stem Cell InstituteCHA UniversitySeoulRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.CHA Bio & Diostech Co., Ltd.SeoulRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Myongji Hospital Cardiac CenterKwandong University College of MedicineGwangjuRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Department of Stem Cell Biology, School of MedicineKonKuk UniversitySeoulRepublic of Korea

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