Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 35, Issue 12, pp 2021–2030 | Cite as

Proteomic analysis of cloned porcine conceptuses during the implantation period

  • Yeoung-Gyu Ko
  • Hae-Geum Park
  • Gyu-Tae Yeom
  • Seongsoo Hwang
  • Hyun Kim
  • Soo-Bong Park
  • Bo-Suck Yang
  • Young Min Song
  • Jae-Hyeon Cho
Original Research Paper

Abstract

Differentially regulated proteins within porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT)-derived conceptuses were compared with conceptuses that were derived from natural matings on day 14 of pregnancy. Proteins that were expressed prominently on day 14 were identified in SCNT-derived conceptuses using 2-D PAGE and MALDI-TOF MS. Sixty eight proteins were identified as being differentially regulated in the SCNT-derived conceptuses. Among these, 62 were down-regulated whereas the other six proteins were up-regulated. Glycolytic proteins, such as pyruvate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase, were down-regulated in the SCNT-derived conceptuses whereas apoptosis-related genes as annexin V, Hsp60, and lamin A were up-regulated. Thus, apoptosis-related genes are expressed at significantly higher levels in the SCNT-derived conceptuses than in the control conceptuses, whereas metabolism-related genes are significantly reduced.

Keywords

Apoptosis-related genes Birthrate in GM pigs Conceptuses Embryo implantation Gestation day 14 GM-pigs Proteomic analysis in GM-piglet cells Somatic cell nuclear transfer 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by grants from the Agenda Program (No. PJ0086322013), Rural Development Administration, Republic of Korea.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yeoung-Gyu Ko
    • 1
  • Hae-Geum Park
    • 1
  • Gyu-Tae Yeom
    • 1
  • Seongsoo Hwang
    • 1
  • Hyun Kim
    • 1
  • Soo-Bong Park
    • 1
  • Bo-Suck Yang
    • 2
  • Young Min Song
    • 2
  • Jae-Hyeon Cho
    • 3
  1. 1.Animal Genetic Resources StationNational Institute of Animal ScienceNamwonKorea
  2. 2.Department of Animal Science & BiotechnologyGyeongnam National University of Science and TechnologyJinjuKorea
  3. 3.Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Institute of Agriculture and Life Science, College of Veterinary MedicineGyeongsang National UniversityJinjuKorea

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