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Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 34, Issue 10, pp 1951–1957 | Cite as

Chemically-defined scaffolds created with electrospun synthetic nanofibers to maintain mouse embryonic stem cell culture under feeder-free conditions

  • Li Liu
  • Qinghua Yuan
  • Jian Shi
  • Xin Li
  • Dongju Jung
  • Li Wang
  • Kaori Yamauchi
  • Norio Nakatsuji
  • Ken-ichiro KameiEmail author
  • Yong Chen
Original Research Paper

Abstract

Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are useful resources for drug discovery, developmental biology and disease studies. Cellular microenvironmental cues play critical roles in regulating ESC functions, but it is challenging to control them with synthetic components. Nanofibers hold a potential to create artificial cellular cues for controlling cell adhesion and cell–cell interactions. Mouse ESC (mESC) were cultured on electrospun nanofibers made from polymethylglutarimide (PMGI), which is a synthetic thermoplastic polymer stable under culture conditions. Both topology and the density of PMGI nanofibers were key factors. mESCs on nanofibers had a growth rate comparable to those cultured conventionally and retained their pluripotency. Furthermore, self-renewed ESCs differentiated into all three germ layers thereby providing a reliable way to expand mESCs without feeder cells.

Keywords

Extracellular matrix Microenvironment Mouse embryonic stem cells Nanofiber scaffolds Self-renewal 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B) and Young Scientists (B) of the Japan Society for Promotion of Science (JSPS, No. 22710116 and 22350104, respectively) and the European Commission through a project contract (CP-FP 214566-2, Nanoscales). We thank Dr. K. Hasegawa, Dr. C. Fockenberg and Ms. M. Nakajima for helpful discussions and supports.

Supplementary material

10529_2012_973_MOESM1_ESM.docx (12 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 11 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Li Liu
    • 1
  • Qinghua Yuan
    • 1
  • Jian Shi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xin Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dongju Jung
    • 1
  • Li Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kaori Yamauchi
    • 1
    • 3
  • Norio Nakatsuji
    • 1
  • Ken-ichiro Kamei
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yong Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS)Kyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Ecole Normale Supérieure, CNRS-ENS-UPMC UMR 8640ParisFrance
  3. 3.Laboratory of Embryonic Stem Cell ResearchStem Cell Research Center, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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