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Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 34, Issue 1, pp 145–151 | Cite as

Genome shuffling improves production of the low-temperature alkalophilic lipase by Acinetobacter johnsonii

  • HaiKuan Wang
  • Jie Zhang
  • XiaoJie Wang
  • Wei Qi
  • YuJie Dai
Original Research Paper

Abstract

The production of a low-temperature alkalophilic lipase from Acinetobacter johnsonii was improved using genome shuffling. The starting populations, obtained by UV irradiation and diethyl sulfate mutagenesis, were subjected to recursive protoplast fusion. The optimal conditions for protoplast formation and regeneration were 0.15 mg lysozyme/ml for 45 min at 37°C. The protoplasts were inactivated under UV for 20 min or heated at 60°C for 60 min and a fusant probability of ~98% was observed. The positive colonies were created by fusing the inactivated protoplasts. After two rounds of genome shuffling, one strain, F22, with a lipase activity of 7 U/ml was obtained.

Keywords

Acinetobacter johnsonii Alkalophilic lipase Genome shuffling Lipase Low-temperature alkalophilic lipase 

Notes

Acknowledgment

This work was supported by Tianjin Natural Science Foundation (No. 09JCZDJC17800 and No. 07JCYBJC07900), Tianjin, PR China.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • HaiKuan Wang
    • 1
  • Jie Zhang
    • 1
  • XiaoJie Wang
    • 1
  • Wei Qi
    • 1
  • YuJie Dai
    • 1
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Industrial Fermentation Microbiology, Ministry of EducationCollege of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and TechnologyTianjinChina

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