Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 32, Issue 8, pp 1173–1179 | Cite as

Over-expression of a glutathione S-transferase gene, GsGST, from wild soybean (Glycine soja) enhances drought and salt tolerance in transgenic tobacco

  • Wei Ji
  • Yanming Zhu
  • Yong Li
  • Liang Yang
  • Xiaowen Zhao
  • Hua Cai
  • Xi Bai
Original Research Paper

Abstract

Glycine soja is a species of soybean that survives in adverse environments including high salt and drought conditions. We constructed a cDNA library from G. soja seedlings treated with NaCl and isolated a glutathione S-transferase gene (GsGST: GQ265911) from the library. The cDNA encoding GsGST contains an open reading frame of 660 bp and the predicted protein belongs to the tau class of GST family proteins. Tobacco plants over-expressing the GsGST gene showed sixfold higher GST activity than wild-type plants. Transgenic tobacco plants exhibited enhanced dehydration tolerance. T2 transgenic tobacco plants showed higher tolerance at the seedling stage than wild-type plants to salt and mannitol as demonstrated by longer root length and less growth retardation.

Keywords

Glutathione S-transferase Soybean Stress tolerance Transgenic tobacco Wild soybean 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The research was sponsored by the “863” project (2007AA10Z193) and the Key Research Plan of Heilongjiang Province (GA06B103-3). This work was also partially supported by the Key Laboratory of Agricultural Biological Functional Genes (Northeast Agricultural University), the Ministry of Education (NSGJ2009-003), and the Innovation Team Project in NEAU (190214).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wei Ji
    • 1
  • Yanming Zhu
    • 1
  • Yong Li
    • 1
  • Liang Yang
    • 1
  • Xiaowen Zhao
    • 1
  • Hua Cai
    • 1
  • Xi Bai
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Bioengineering LaboratoryNortheast Agricultural UniversityHarbinChina

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