Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 31, Issue 8, pp 1217–1222

Comparison of methods to assess the enzyme accessibility and hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic substrates

  • Richard P. Chandra
  • Shannon M. Ewanick
  • Pablo A. Chung
  • Kathy Au-Yeung
  • Luis Del Rio
  • Warren Mabee
  • Jack N. Saddler
Original Research Paper

Abstract

Fiber size analysis, water retention value, and Simons’ stain measurements were assessed for their potential to predict the susceptibility of a given substrate to enzymatic hydrolysis. Slight modifications were made to the fiber size analysis and water retention protocols to adapt these measurements to evaluate substrates for cellulolytic hydrolysis rather than pulps for papermaking. Lodgepole pine was pretreated by the steam and ethanol-organosolv processes under varying conditions. The Simons’ stain procedure proved to be an effective method for indicating the potential ease of enzymatic hydrolysis of substrates pretreated by either process or when the pretreatment conditions were altered.

Keywords

Bioconversion Cellulase Ethanol Simons’ stain 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard P. Chandra
    • 1
  • Shannon M. Ewanick
    • 1
  • Pablo A. Chung
    • 1
  • Kathy Au-Yeung
    • 1
  • Luis Del Rio
    • 1
  • Warren Mabee
    • 1
  • Jack N. Saddler
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Wood Science, Faculty of ForestryUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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