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Biotechnology Letters

, 31:999 | Cite as

Extracellular phycoerythrin-like protein released by freshwater cyanobacteria Oscillatoria and Scytonema sp.

  • Karseno
  • Kazuo Harada
  • Takeshi Bamba
  • Susilaningsih Dwi
  • Aparat Mahakhant
  • Tomoaki Yoshikawa
  • Kazumasa Hirata
Original Research Paper

Abstract

During growth of the freshwater cyanobacteria, Oscillatoria sp. BTCC/A0004, and Scytonema sp. TISTR 8208, a pink pigment is released into the growth medium. The pigment from each source had a molecular weight of approximately 250 kDa and had adsorption maxima at 560 and 620 nm. These results suggest that pink pigment is a phycoerythrin-like protein. It inhibited the growth of green algae, Chlorella fusca and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, but not other cyanobacteria or true bacteria. The concentration at which growth inhibition 50% occurred was 0.5, 6 and more than 10 mg ml−1, respectively.

Keywords

Extracellular pigment Oscillatoria sp. Phycoerythrin-like protein Scytonema sp 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karseno
    • 1
  • Kazuo Harada
    • 1
  • Takeshi Bamba
    • 1
  • Susilaningsih Dwi
    • 2
  • Aparat Mahakhant
    • 3
  • Tomoaki Yoshikawa
    • 1
  • Kazumasa Hirata
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied and Environmental Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical SciencesOsaka UniversityOsakaJapan
  2. 2.Research and Development Center for BiotechnologyThe Indonesian Institute of SciencesCibinongIndonesia
  3. 3.Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological ResearchChatuchackThailand

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