Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 31, Issue 5, pp 737–741 | Cite as

Detection of living Salmonella cells using bioluminescence

  • Masaaki Urata
  • Rei Iwata
  • Kenichi Noda
  • Yuji Murakami
  • Akio Kuroda
Original Research Paper

Abstract

ATP-based bioluminescence using mutant firefly luciferase was combined with an immunochromatographic lateral flow test strip assay for Salmonella enteritidis detection. In this combination method, the Salmonella-antibody–gold complex captured at the test line on the test strip was lysed by heat-treatment, and the ATP released from the cells was measured using mutant luciferase. This method resulted in approximately 1,000 times higher sensitivity in the detection of Salmonella (i.e. 103 c.f.u./ml) compared to immunochromatographic lateral flow assay.

Keywords

ATP assay Immunochromatographic lateral flow assay Mutant firefly luciferase Salmonella enteritidis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported in part by the Special Coordination Funds from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. We would like to thank the staff members of the Research Institute for Nanodevice and Bio Systems, Hiroshima University for their helpful discussions and advice.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masaaki Urata
    • 1
  • Rei Iwata
    • 2
  • Kenichi Noda
    • 1
  • Yuji Murakami
    • 1
  • Akio Kuroda
    • 2
  1. 1.Research Institute for Nanodevice and Bio SystemsHiroshima UniversityHigashihiroshimaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Molecular BiotechnologyHiroshima UniversityHigashihiroshimaJapan

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