Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 31, Issue 8, pp 1183–1189 | Cite as

Enhancement of bone formation by genetically-engineered bone marrow stromal cells expressing BMP-2, VEGF and angiopoietin-1

  • Hongliang Hou
  • Xiaoling Zhang
  • Tingting Tang
  • Kerong Dai
  • Ruowen Ge
Original Research Paper

Abstract

To explore the potential of combined delivery of osteogenic and angiogenic factors to bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) for repair of critical-size bone defects, we followed the formation of bone and vessels in tissue-engineered constructs in nude mice and rabbit bone defects upon introducing different combinations of BMP-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) to BMSCs with adenoviral vectors. Better osteogenesis and angiogenesis were found in co-delivery group of BMP-2, VEGF and angiopoietin-1 than any other combination of these factors in both animal models, indicating combined gene delivery of angiopoietin-1 and VEGF165 into a tissue-engineered construct produces an additive effect on BMP-2-induced osteogenesis.

Keywords

Angiopoietin-1 Bone morphogenic protein 2 Bone tissue engineering Critical-size bone defect Vascular endothelial growth factor 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hongliang Hou
    • 1
  • Xiaoling Zhang
    • 2
  • Tingting Tang
    • 1
  • Kerong Dai
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ruowen Ge
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedics, Ninth People’s HospitalShanghai Jiao Tong University School of MedicineShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Institute of Health Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological SciencesChinese Academy of SciencesShanghaiChina
  3. 3.Department of Biological SciencesNational University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore

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