Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 31, Issue 4, pp 551–555 | Cite as

Bacillus sphaericus Mtx1 and Mtx2 toxins co-expressed in Escherichia coli are synergistic against Aedes aegypti larvae

  • Amporn Rungrod
  • Natalia Kristianti Tjahaja
  • Sumarin Soonsanga
  • Mongkon Audtho
  • Boonhiang Promdonkoy
Original Research Paper

Abstract

Mtx1 and Mtx2 are mosquitocidal toxins produced by some strains of Bacillus sphaericus during vegetative phase of growth. Mtx1 from B. sphaericus 2297 shows higher toxicity against Culex quinquefasciatus larvae than to Aedes aegypti larvae whereas Mtx2 from B. sphaericus 2297 shows lower toxicity against C. quinquefasciatus than to A. aegypti larvae. To test synergism of these toxins against A. aegypti larvae, mtx1 and mtx2 genes were cloned into a single plasmid and expressed in Escherichia coli. Cells producing both Mtx1 and Mtx2 toxins exhibited high synergistic activity against A. aegypti larvae approximately 10 times compared to cells expressing only a single toxin. Co-expression of both toxins offers an alternative to improve efficacy of recombinant bacterial insecticides. There is a high possibility to develop these toxins to be used as an environmentally friendly mosquito control agent.

Keywords

Aedes aegypti Bacillus sphaericus Co-expression Fusion protein Mosquitocidal toxin Synergism 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amporn Rungrod
    • 1
  • Natalia Kristianti Tjahaja
    • 1
  • Sumarin Soonsanga
    • 1
  • Mongkon Audtho
    • 1
  • Boonhiang Promdonkoy
    • 1
  1. 1.National Center for Genetic Engineering and BiotechnologyNational Science and Technology Development AgencyKlong Luang, PathumthaniThailand

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