Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 30, Issue 3, pp 547–554 | Cite as

Transgenic cotton expressing synthesized scorpion insect toxin AaHIT gene confers enhanced resistance to cotton bollworm (Heliothis armigera) larvae

  • Jiahe Wu
  • Xiaoli Luo
  • Zhian Wang
  • Yingchuan Tian
  • Aihua Liang
  • Yi Sun
Original Research Paper

Abstract

A synthetic scorpion Hector Insect Toxin (AaHIT) gene, under the control of a CaMV35S promoter, was cloned into cotton via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Southern blot analyses indicated that integration of the transgene varied from one to more than three estimated copies per genome; seven homozygous transgenic lines with one copy of the T-DNA insert were then selected by PCR and Southern blot analysis. AaHIT expression was from 0.02 to 0.43% of total soluble protein determined by western blot. These homozygous transgenic lines killed larvae of cotton bollworm (Heliothis armigera) by 44–98%. The AaHIT gene could used therefore an alternative to Bt toxin and proteinase inhibitor genes for producing transgenic cotton crops with effective control of bollworm.

Keywords

Androctonus australis Bollworm control Cotton (transgenic) Gossypium hirsutum Scorpion toxin in cotton 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was supported by the grants from the Nature Science Foundation of China (39970416), and the Science and Technology Department of Shanxi Province (041001-1).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jiahe Wu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaoli Luo
    • 1
  • Zhian Wang
    • 1
  • Yingchuan Tian
    • 2
  • Aihua Liang
    • 1
  • Yi Sun
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Cotton Research and Biotechnology Research CentreShanxi Academy of Agricultural SciencesTaiyuanP.R. China
  2. 2.National Key Laboratory of Plant Genomics, Institute of MicrobiologyChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingP.R. China

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