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Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 29, Issue 9, pp 1349–1352 | Cite as

Carbon dioxide fixation by Chlorella kessleri, C. vulgaris, Scenedesmus obliquus and Spirulina sp. cultivated in flasks and vertical tubular photobioreactors

  • Michele Greque de Morais
  • Jorge Alberto Vieira CostaEmail author
Original Research Paper

Abstract

CO2 at different concentrations were added to cultures of the eukaryotic microalgae, Chlorella kessleri, C. vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus, and the prokaryotic cyanobacterium, Spirulina sp., growing in flasks and in a photobioreactor. In each case, the best kinetics and carbon fixation rate were with a vertical tubular photobioreactor. Overall, Spirulina sp. had the highest rates. Spirulina sp., Sc. obliquus and C. vulgaris could grow with up to 18% CO2.

Keywords

CO2 Chlorella Photobioreactor Scenedesmus Spirulina 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank the Brazilian Central Electric Company (Centrais Elétricas Brasileiras S.A., Eletrobrás) and the Thermal Energy Electricity Generating Company (Companhia de Geração Térmica de Energia Elétrica, CGTEE) for financial support.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michele Greque de Morais
    • 1
  • Jorge Alberto Vieira Costa
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Department of ChemistryFederal University Foundation of Rio GrandeRio GrandeBrazil

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