Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 28, Issue 20, pp 1641–1648 | Cite as

Redifferentiation of chondrocytes and cartilage formation under intermittent hydrostatic pressure

  • Jan Heyland
  • Katharina Wiegandt
  • Christiane Goepfert
  • Stefanie Nagel-Heyer
  • Eduard Ilinich
  • Udo Schumacher
  • Ralf Pörtner
Original Paper

Abstract

Since articular cartilage is subjected to varying loads in vivo and undergoes cyclic hydrostatic pressure during periods of loading, it is hypothesized that mimicking these in vivo conditions can enhance synthesis of important matrix components during cultivation in vitro. Thus, the influence of intermittent loading during redifferentiation of chondrocytes in alginate beads, and during cartilage formation was investigated. A statistically significant increased synthesis of glycosaminoglycan and collagen type II during redifferentiation of chondrocytes embedded in alginate beads, as well as an increase in glycosaminoglycan content of tissue-engineered cartilage, was found compared to control without load. Immunohistological staining indicated qualitatively a high expression of collagen type II for both cases.

Keywords

Chondrocytes Cartilage Hydrodynamic pressure Bioreactor 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan Heyland
    • 1
  • Katharina Wiegandt
    • 2
  • Christiane Goepfert
    • 2
  • Stefanie Nagel-Heyer
    • 2
  • Eduard Ilinich
    • 3
  • Udo Schumacher
    • 4
  • Ralf Pörtner
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of Life ScienceHamburg University of Applied ScienceHamburgGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Bioprocess and Biosystems EngineeringHamburg University of TechnologyHamburgGermany
  3. 3.Institute of Polymer CompositesHamburg University of TechnologyHamburgGermany
  4. 4.Department of AnatomyUniversity Medical Center Hamburg-EppendorfHamburgGermany

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