Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 28, Issue 20, pp 1637–1640 | Cite as

Epicatechin and catechin may prevent coffee berry disease by inhibition of appressorial melanization of Colletotrichum kahawae

  • Zhenjia Chen
  • Jingsi Liang
  • Changhe Zhang
  • Carlos J. RodriguesJr
Original Paper

Abstract

Colletotrichum kahawae is the causal agent of coffee berry disease. Appressorial melanization is essential for the fungal penetration of plant cuticle. Epicatechin is abundant in green coffee berry pericarp. Inoculation of C. kahawae conidial suspension containing 1.2 mg epicatechin or catechin/ml did not affect conidial germination or appressorial formation but appressorial melanization was completely inhibited and infection by the treated conidia was less than 30% of the untreated control. Epicatechin and catechin may, therefore, prevent coffee berry disease by inhibition of the appressorial melanization of C. kahawae.

Keywords

Catechin Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Colletotrichum kahawae Cuticle penetration Epicatechin 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhenjia Chen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jingsi Liang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Changhe Zhang
    • 3
  • Carlos J. RodriguesJr
    • 1
  1. 1.Centro de Investigação das Ferrugens do CafeeiroIICTQuinta do MarquêsPortugal
  2. 2.Environment and Plant Protection InstituteChinese Academy of Tropical Agriculture SciencesHainanChina
  3. 3.Instituto Tecnologia Química e BiológicaUniversidade Nova LisboaOeirasPortugal

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