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Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 27, Issue 9, pp 655–660 | Cite as

Protection of osteoblastic cells from freeze/thaw cycle-induced oxidative stress by green tea polyphenol

  • Dong-Wook Han
  • Hak Hee Kim
  • Mi Hee Lee
  • Hyun Sook Baek
  • Kwon-Yong Lee
  • Suong-Hyu Hyon
  • Jong-Chul ParkEmail author
Article

Abstract

Green tea polyphenol (GTP) together with dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) were added to a freezing solution of osteoblastic cells (rat calvarial osteoblasts and human osteosarcoma cells) exposed to repeated freeze/thaw cycles (FTC) to induce oxidative stress. When cells were subjected to 3 FTCs, freezing medium containing 10% (v/v) DMSO and 500 μg GTP ml−1 significantly (p < 0.05) suppressed cell detachment and growth inhibition by over 63% and protected cell morphology. Furthermore, the alkaline phosphatase activity of osteoblastic cells was appreciably maintained after 2 and 3 FTCs in this mixture. Polyphenols may thus be of use as a cell cryopreservant and be advantageous in such fields as cell transplantation and tissue engineering.

Keywords

green tea polyphenol multiple freeze/thaw cycles osteoblastic cells oxidative stress 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dong-Wook Han
    • 1
  • Hak Hee Kim
    • 1
  • Mi Hee Lee
    • 2
  • Hyun Sook Baek
    • 1
  • Kwon-Yong Lee
    • 3
  • Suong-Hyu Hyon
    • 4
  • Jong-Chul Park
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Medical EngineeringYonsei University College of MedicineSeodaemun-guKorea
  2. 2.Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical ScienceYonsei University College of MedicineSeodaemun-guKorea
  3. 3.Bioengineering Research Center, Department of Mechanical EngineeringSejong UniversityGwangjin-guKorea
  4. 4.Institute for Frontier Medical SciencesKyoto UniversitySakyo-kuJapan

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